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Reviews Published in Newspapers

This page contains excerpts from reviews and mentions of the Financial Aid Information Page that were published in major newspapers. This collection of excerpts represents a small subset of the more than 1,000 articles that have mentioned the page. [We stopped tracking reviews of the site in mid-1998.]

The Wall Street Journal published a profile of Mark Kantrowitz on July 3, 2010, Student-Loan Gadfly Gets a Starring Role as the U.S. Pushes Out the Private Lenders.

1998

Albuquerque Tribune (June 5, 1998)

To college-bound parents: Help is here

"You can also compute your expected family contribution on your own using one of the online calculators at the Financial Aid Information Page on the World Wide Web (http://www.finaid.org)."

Salt Lake Tribune (May 25, 1998)

Scholarships Available on The Internet, by Robert Bryson.

"There are other free sites also offering scholarships or financial aid advice. They include: ... The Financial Aid Information Page (www.finaid.org), which boasts a host of financial aid options."

Florida Times-Union (May 22, 1998)

Call Box, by Nicole McGill.

"Free information about scholarships is available on the Internet at several sites. One of Call Box's favorite sites is the Financial Aid Information Page at www.finaid.org. It's sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators."

Florence Morning News (May 18, 1998)

College bound students beware financial aid scams, by Wade Jeffords.

"Perhaps the best place to start looking for financial aid information is the FinAid page (www.finaid.org), according to college financial aid administrators, USA Today and Internet search engines Lycos and Yahoo. ... The FinAid page provides lots of advice and information about scams, common myths, legitimate loans and scholarships, government aid and local help."

The Detroit News (June 4, 1998)
Port Huron Times Herald (May 19, 1998)
Maryville Daily Times (May 12, 1998)
Shreveport Times (May 10, 1998)
CNN Interactive (May 9, 1998)

Scholarships on the Internet, by Karen Jenkins Holt, Gannett News Service.

"There are currently five free databases that are as good as anything you can get by paying money," said Mark Kantrowitz, author of the highly respected Financial Aid Information Page (www.finaid.org). "There's no need to spend money to find scholarships on the Internet." Kantrowitz's page on the World Wide Web provides links to all the free services."

St. Paul Pioneer Press (May 4, 1998)
St. Louis Post Dispatch (April 20, 1998)
Akron Beacon Journal (April 20, 1998)

Scholarship search skips the charges, by Glen Gamboa, Knight-Ridder News Service.

"The Financial Aid Information Page (www.finaid.org) is an extremely helpful resource for finding money for college. It is maintained by Mark Kantrowitz, author of the Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students. Not only does it offer hints on how to secure the most financial aid, it also provides online calculators to determine how much you need to save each month in order to have enough when college rolls around. Kantrowitz's Financial Aid Information Page also provides links to various lenders and other sources for guaranteed student loans and other financial options."

Philadelphia Inquirer (April 19, 1998)

You're in! Now, about the tuition ..., by James M. O'Neill.

"Several Web sites let students punch in background data on themselves, then the sites spit back information on scholarships for which they might qualify. Two such sites can be found at www.fastweb.com and www.finaid.org."

Antioch Ledger Dispatch (April 18, 1998)

College selection is two-way deal, by Lee Kravetz.

"Once again, the Internet is a good source for scholarship information. Sites such as http://www.finaid.org/ are updated weekly by the National Association of Student Financial Aid."

Detroit Jewish News (April 17, 1998)

Show Me The Money, by Matt Mossman.

"On the Net, any search engine should point you to Web sites that help you hunt down tuition money. If you've got a Jones for cyber-shopping, try these sites: FinAid: A good resource to find out basic information on how scholarships and school financing works. Provides links to major scholarship sources. Find it at http://www.finaid.com."

Champaign News-Gazette (April 16, 1998)

Hit Return, by Katie Sutton.

"Many juniors and seniors are searching for scholarships. Among the best places to look are the many financial aid Web sites. FinAid: The Financial Aid Page (http://www.finaid.org/) is a comprehensive free resource for students beginning the scholarship search. It matches the proper scholarships to your personal profile and offers financial aid calculators, a glossary, and a bibliography."

Rochester Sunday Telegram (May 17, 1998)
Edmond Evening Sun (April 15, 1998)
The New York Times (April 5, 1998)

How to Go to Harvard Free, by Benjamin Kaplan.

"Another fruitful approach is surfing the Internet. The trick is knowing how to wade through the useless information that bombards any attempt at Net-based scholarship searches. A good starting point on the World Wide Web is at http://www.finaid.org, which is affiliated with the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators and has links to a variety of scholarship Web pages and free database search sites."

Chillicothe Gazette (April 4, 1998)

Finding scholarships using the Internet, by Melissa Martin.

"High school students and parents may want to check out the Internet in their search for college scholarships. The Internet is a valuable source of information about colleges, careers and employment. ... More information about scholarships using the Internet: The Financial Aid Information Page: http://www.finaid.org"

Florida Times-Union (April 1, 1998)

Call Box, by Nicole McGill.

"Did You Know ... The Financial Aid Information Page on the Internet lists scholarship scams. The site also has tips on finding money and answers to frequently asked questions about financial aid. It was created by Mark Kantrowitz, author of The Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students, and is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. The address is www.finaid.org."

White Plains Reporter Dispatch (March 29, 1998)

Searching the Web, by Noreen Seebacher.

"Looking for money for college? Start with the computerized option developed by the nation's financial aid administrators. The site (http://www.finaid.org) offers a number of great scholarship searches you can use for free."

Silver City Daily Press (March 28, 1998)

Ask the AG

"How can I obtain legitimate information about the availability of scholarships? Reference books on tracking down and applying for scholarships are available at your local library. Also, the Internet contains several web sites that offer tips on available scholarships and more warnings about scams, such as the site created by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (http://www.finaid.org). This web site includes a scholarship scam alert that lists suspicious scholarship offers reported to the Federal Trade Commission."

Charlotte Observer (March 26, 1998)

Getting through financial aid

"www.finaid.org - The premier Web site on financial aid. Try the loan debt calculator to see if you will realistically be able to pay back the amount of student loans you could receive, or to get an estimate of the amount of financial aid you could receive. Offers links to government aid sites, college financial aid pages, and other college admission and financial aid sites. "

Stillwater News Press (March 24, 1998)

College Information Web Sites

"www.finaid.org - Provides information about all types of financial aid from the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators."

Rochester Democrat and Chronicle (April 5, 1998)
Fort Worth Star Telegram (March 26, 1998)
Atlanta Constitution (March 24, 1998)

Aids to college admission include forms, virtual tours, by Frances Katz, Cox News Service.

"http://www.finaid.org, the Financial Aid Information Page, is an exhaustive list of sites and organizations offering financial aid to college-bound students."

Beaumont Enterprise (April 10, 1998)
Atlanta Journal (March 24, 1998)

Aids to college admission include rankings, tours, by Frances Katz, Cox News Service.

"The Financial Aid Information Page, http://www.finaid.org, is an exhaustive list of sites of organizations offering financial aid."

Rocky Mountain News (March 23, 1998)

Internet has wealth of investment advice, by Hank Ezell, Cox News Service.

"Saving for College: One of the best sites: www.finaid.org"

Indianapolis Star (March 23, 1998)
Knoxville News-Sentinel (March 22, 1998)

Time Digital ranks financial sites

"Time Digital has published a top-10 list of financial World Wide Web sites. Time Digital, an offshoot of Time news magazine, reviews the sites in select editions of the March 23 issue of Time. The Time Digital picks include: ... Financial Aid Information Page (www.finaid.org) most comprehensive for finding student loans."

Atlanta Journal-Constitution (March 15, 1998)

Internet can yield wealth of financial information, by Hank Ezell.

"Saving for college. Links to hundreds of useful sites, plus coverage of scams, scholarship indexes, loan counseling. One of the best of the vacuum-cleaner sites: http://www.finaid.org/"

Providence Journal-Bulletin (April 23, 1998)
Cleveland Plain Dealer (March 30, 1998)
Stuart News (March 26, 1998)
Lexington Herald-Leader (March 14, 1998)

Some resources for college savings.

"Calculators: Both the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (www.finaid.org) and the Student Loan Corp. (www.salliemae.com) have interactive calculators on their sites on the World Wide Web. Each lets you project what college costs will be for your children and how much you must begin to save."

Los Angeles Times (April 27, 1998)
Los Angeles Times (March 12, 1998)
Los Angeles Times (November 17, 1997)

How to Avoid Rip-Offs in Seeking Scholarships, by Tina Nguyen.

"For more information, consult: ... A comprehensive Web page by Mark Kantrowitz, author of "Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students" (Prentice Hall). It includes links to grant, scholarship, and advisory services. www.finaid.org"

Chicago Tribune (March 12, 1998)

Extra Credit

"With the costs of higher education getting higher, most of tomorrow's college students also will be financial aid applicants. Created by Mark Kantrowitz, author of The Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students, FinAid www.finaid.org offers a free, comprehensive guide to the complicated process of getting financial aid. The site is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators but promises to be independent and objective. It's nothing fancy but it is frequently updated and encyclopedic. If FinAid doesn't have something, it probably has a link to it."

Contra Costa Sunday Times (May 3, 1998)
Orange County Register (March 8, 1998)

Search Engines, A Closer Look, by Dawn C. Chmielewski.

"Searching the Internet is like drinking water from a fire hose: The torrent of information is more than you could possibly swallow. ... On Yahoo! you'll find ... FinAid, a one-stop resource that alerts you to scams, allows you to calculate your eligibility and identify lenders that issue educational loans."

Christian Science Monitor (March 2, 1998)

If You Think Education Is Expensive ..., by Laurel Shaper Walters.

"www.finaid.org The Financial Aid Information Page, sponsored by aid administrators, offers links to many other sites, including scam alerts, scholarship databases, and cost calculators."

New York Daily News (March 1, 1998)

AnswerNet, by Arul Louis.

"Start with FinAid (http://www.finaid.org), a Web site sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. It has loads of information about sources of scholarships, student loans, and other assistance programs. It also has links to other sites that will help you hunt for scholarships."

Joliet Herald-News (March 1, 1998)
Waukegan News-Sun (February 28, 1998)

Financial aid online

"www.finaid.org The FinAid Information Page delivers everything from a quick estimate of your expected family contribution to an ask-the-experts department to a description of almost every other financial aid and scholarship Web site. This privately published, 4-year-old site is a good place to start your search."

Minneapolis Star Tribune (February 26, 1998)

Editors' picks: Web sites give tips on finding financial aid, by Beth Thibodeau.

"If a student has already been accepted at a college or university, he or shee has probably moved on to the next step -- looking for financial aid. The Web can be a useful tool. The National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators has a site (http://www.finaid.org) with links to financial aid offices at many schools. The site also lists answers to frequently asked questions regarding financial aid and warns students about scholarship scams. A link, Ask the Aid Advisor, allows users to ask one of more than 100 financial aid administrators specific questions."

The Morning Call (February 15, 1998)

On your way to college? Here's how to get the money!

"The premier Website on financial aid gives you a loan debt calculator to figure out if you will realistically be able to pay back the amount of student loans you could receive, or to get an estimate of the financial aid you could receive. This site offers links to government aid sites, college financial aid pages and other college admission and financial aid sites. You can get all this at www.finaid.org."

Tacoma News Tribune (June 1, 1998)
Tulsa World (May 22, 1998)
Chicago Sunday Sun-Times (May 3, 1998)
Rochester Democrat and Chronicle (April 5, 1998)
San Antonio Express-News (March 30, 1998)
Wilmington Sunday News Journal (March 22, 1998)
Olympian (March 16, 1998)
Jackson Sun (March 14, 1998)
Detroit News (February 9, 1998)

Motivation can pay dividends, by Rene Wisely, The Detroit News.

"One avenue she didn't try was the Internet, which Wayne State's Jones said is the best place to begin a search. "I really like Mark Kantrowitz's home page at www.finaid.org", she said."

Atlantic City Press (February 2, 1998)

High Finance: Parents, students should apply for financial aid now, by Steven V. Cronin.

"If you are desperately seeking scholarships, your local guidance office or the Internet should provide all the search opportunities you need. Kantrowitz's FinAid: The Financial Aid Information page not only contains a wealth of information on financial aid, it also contains a free scholarship search service. The site can be found at www.finaid.org. Parents should also check out Kantrowitz's Web site for some easy to understand information about how they can plan for their children's college education."

Chicago Tribune (February 9, 1998)
Iowa City Press-Citizen (February 5, 1998)
Dubuque Telegraph Herald (February 1, 1998)
Seattle Times & Post-Intelligencer (February 1, 1998)

Web sites provide assistance in planning for college future, by Tribune Media Services.

"It's that time of year when many people are looking ahead to paying for college. Here are several Web sites dealing with the subject, brought to you by Excite! Financial Aid Information Page, http://www.finaid.org/. Mark Kantrowitz, co-author of "The Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students," has created an extremely thorough map of the higher education financial thicket, which is filled with thorns and muddling mazes. Not only does he provide a myriad of sources for loans, grants, and other scholarship assistance, he also documents the scams and false promises that are hidden in some online offerings. There are calculators, discussion forums, and links to school financial aid offices, making FinAid indispensible for anyone planning to pay tuition expenses."

Boston Globe (January 26, 1998)

Cramming for financial aid, by Mary Sit.

"www.finaid.org This is the grand-daddy of all Web sites. It takes time to get through this, but it links you to almost anything you are searching for, including scholarships."

Chicago Sunday Sun-Times (January 25, 1998)

Financial aid lessons, by Francine Knowles.

"Here are some other helpful books, online resources and phone numbers. ... The National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, www.finaid.org"

Washington Observer-Reporter (January 25, 1998)

The tuition tightrope

"The Financial Aid Information Page (http://www.finaid.org/) on the world-wide web can help students or their parents better understand the financial aid process."

Dayton Daily News (January 23, 1998)

Now is the time to apply for student financial aid, by Mark Fisher and Lynn Hulsey.

"Beware of any scholarship "locator services" that charge a fee; search first on web pages such as www.finaid.org, sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators."

Portland Press Herald (January 23, 1998)

Online

"FinAid (http://www.finaid.org/) is a non-profit financial aid information site that includes a savings-plan calculator."

Modesto Bee (January 20, 1998)

Supermarket for Scholarships, by Diane Flores.

"FinAid (www.finaid.org) provides online calculators so families can budget college expenses."

Newark Sunday Star-Ledger (January 18, 1998)

Student sleuths can reap financial aid, by Bob Weinstein.

"www.finaid.com contains information on a range of financial aid topics and links to dozens of useful sites."

Marin Independent Journal (March 12, 1998)
Poughkeepsie Journal (February 12, 1998)
Wilkes-Barre Times Leader (February 9, 1998)
Spokane Spokesman-Review (February 7, 1998)
Detroit News and Free Press (January 4, 1998)

College-bound get help

"A broader web site is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators at www.finaid.org."

1997

Hendersonville Times-News (December 30, 1997)
Lexington Dispatch (June 14, 1997)

Where to find aid

"The Financial Aid Information Page (www.finaid.org) is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators and maintained by Mark Kantrowitz. The site contains detailed information on scholarships and loan programs, tools to calculate the amount of aid for which you may be eligible, and hypertext links to other financial aid databases."

Dayton Daily News (December 29, 1997)

The best of SMARTMoney 1997.

"Feb. 17, pg. 8. For the most effective and comprehensive Web site on the topic, financial-aid specialists recommend the Financial Aid Information Page (www.finaid.org), sponsored by the nonprofit National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, as the best first stop for prospective college students."

Newport News Daily Press (December 29, 1997)

WWWhat's Hot?, by Tribune Media Services.

"Financial Aid Information Page, www.finaid.org. Mark Kantrowitz maintains this amazing collection of links to college financial aid information resources on the Net. The page directs visitors to over 500 resources in dozens of categories, including Lenders, Study Abroad, Loan Counselors, and US government Info. Resources are relevant to graduate and undergraduate students, and cover both science and liberal arts disciplines."

Jackson Sun (December 22, 1997)

"For information about financial aid for college costs, check out these sites: www.finaid.org and www.fastweb.com"

Salt Lake City Deseret News (December 15, 1997)

Web sites include information on campus life, financial aid, by Brooke Adams.

"The Financial Aid Information Page (http://www.finaid.org). Excellent site created by Mark Kantrowitz, author of a guide on scholarships and fellowships for math and science students. It is very comprehensive, with loads of info on aid. You'll also appreciate Kantrowitz's calculators, which help you figure out what it will cost to cover college expenses."

New Orleans Times-Picayune (December 11, 1997)

Show Me the College Money; The Internet makes financial aid easier to find, by Siona Carpenter.

"A good place to start doing financial aid homework online is FinAid, the Financial Aid Information Page, which is a huge storehouse of information, covering the gamut of financial aid news and views. There are links to scholarship and fellowship databases, answers to the most frequently asked financial aid questions and tools to help students and parents calculate college costs. ... Searching for money for college? The following web sites can help. FinAid, the Financial Aid Information Page, is a motherlode of financial aid resources, including tools to help students figure out what they'll need, links to scholarship finders and information about books and software. "

Sparta Independent (December 11, 1997)

Web sites you won't want to miss, by Maria Lindler-Steinke.

"The Financial Aid Information Page (http://www.finaid.org): This site provides a free, comprehensive, independent and objective guide to student financial aid and allows students to apply for Federal aid online."

Cleveland Plain Dealer (December 8, 1997)

Giving it the old college try

"If you would like neutral information you can get it from many sources on the World Wide Web. Start with http://www.finaid.org."

Ann Arbor News (December 8, 1997)

"http://www.finaid.org/finaid/scams.html This site gives valuable information on which scholarship search firms offer legitimate services and which do not."

Centre Daily Times (December 4, 1997)

4.0 not required, by Johnny Diag, Knight-Ridder Newspapers.

"The National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators offers an information page. The comprehensive Web site includes tips on avoiding financial aid scams. Calculators are included to help students determine aid eligibility."

Roanoke Times (November 29, 1997)

Questions, answers on prepaid tuition, by Warren Fiske.

"Experts say a good place to start, if you have access to a computer, is the home page offered by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. The web site is http://www.finaid.org/"

Tuscaloosa News (November 20, 1997)

Where students can find aid, by J.A. Dunn.

"Knowing that financial aid is available for a large number of college students is comforting for cash-strapped parents. Finding that aid is another proposition entirely. Luckily, researching scholarships and loan programs is easier now than it ever has been, thanks to the Internet. Here is a listing of popular sites: The Financial Aid Information Page (www.finaid.org) is sponsored by the National Association of Financial Aid Administrators. The site contains information on scholarships and loan programs, tools to calculate the amount of aid for which you may be eligible, and hypertext links to other financial aid databases. The association has another site (http://www.nasfaa.org) that offers consumer scholarship tips."

St. Petersburg Times (November 14, 1997)

A road map for college planning

"Get on-line: If you have access to a computer with an Internet connection, there is more information available than you can probably uses. Below are some key World Wide Web sites you might want to visit. ... http://www.finaid.org FinAid: The Financial Aid Information page -- even more financial aid information."

Washington Times (November 14, 1997)

Unraveling the financial-aid riddle, by Amy Fagan.

"The Financial Aid Information Page on the World Wide Web (http://www.finaid.com) is a comprehensive resource for financial aid and provides a sample FAFSA form as well as other links and services. ... More info: A great source for lists of books specifically on financial aid can be found on the Web (http://www.finaid.org/finaid/bibliography/recommended-books.html). ... The Financial Aid Information Page is a comprehensive page featuring free scholarship-search databases, links to books and other sources, and a wide variety of financial-aid information (http://www.finaid.com)."

Detroit News (November 13, 1997)

Looking for aid?

"If you search for "college scholarships" on the Internet, you'll get thousands of matches. A good starting point is a financial-aid home page -- www.finaid.org -- that is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. It has links to many other pages and can lead you to information about scholarships, scams, and personal finance."

Manasquan Coast Star (November 13, 1997)

Scholarships

"Valuable financial aid information is available on the Internet. The web site of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, http://www.finaid.org, offers links to the financial aid offices at many institutions and other sources."

USA Today (November 13, 1997)
USA Today (Europe) (November 13, 1997)

Searching for aid on the Net.

"Why pay for a search when you can do it free on the Internet? Go to the Web site run by Mark Kantrowitz (for the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators) at www.finaid.org. It has links to four scholarship search services that cost nothing. One of the free search services, FastWEB, is updated with new scholarships sometimes daily."

Detroit News (November 13, 1997)

Looking for aid?

"If you search for "college scholarships" on the Internet, you'll get thousands of matches. A good starting point is a financial aid home page -- www.finaid.org -- that is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. It has links to many other pages and can lead you to information about scholarships, scams, and personal finance."

Manasquan Coast Star (November 13, 1997)

Scholarships

"Valuable financial aid information is available on the Internet. The web site of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, http://www.finaid.org, offers links to the financial aid offices at many institutions and other sources."

USA Today (November 12, 1997)

On-line resources come of age, by Pat Ordovensky.

"A fine starting point for information about college money is the one-stop shop operated by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (www.finaid.org). The site, created by Mark Kantrowitz of Carnegie Mellon University, offers pages of advice on such things as scholarship searches, financial need calculations, and loan programs, plus a vast menu of links to other money-related sites.

From the NASFAA site you're a click or two away from:

  • Five scholarship search services.
  • Several college loan program sites.
  • The government's electronic version of the basic financial aid application.
  • Sites on aid for special interest groups such as the disabled, minorities, gays, and military veterans.
  • Information on prepaid tuition plans.
  • Financial aid sites of individual colleges.
Going through the NASFAA site for college money information eliminates the need to record a long list of Web addresses. And it offers the reassurance that the services aren't scams because they've been cleared by the financial aid community.

If Mark has something on his site, you can be sure it has been checked out pretty thoroughly, says Ron Shunk, the financial aid directory at Gettysburg (Pa.) College."

San Jose Mercury News (November 11, 1997)

Online Resources Help College-Bound

"In addition to workshops and materials available through your local high school, the following, provided by the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC), is a list of resources available on the Internet. Exploring financial aid http://www.finaid.org Comprehensive financial aid information"

Kent South County Journal (November 9, 1997)

Where to go surfing for college money

"Financial Aid Information Page, www.finaid.org. Rich offerings on everything from scam alerts to scholarship searches."

Gainesville Sun (November 5, 1997)

Higher education web sites

"FinAid: The financial aid information page offers links and help. http://www.finaid.org"

Miami Herald (November 4, 1997)

Find scholarships online, by Chris Steinken.

"http://www.finaid.org This is a cyber library of financial aid information. Surf in and find links to tuition payment plans, student loan vendors and college Web sites."

Los Angeles Times (November 3, 1997)

Finances Online, by Lawrence Magid.

"If you're looking for financial information on the Internet, there's plenty out there. Here's a list of 10 of the financial sites in Lycos Top 5% at http://www.pointcom.com: ... FinAid: The Financial Aid Information Page http://www.finaid.org/"

Southfield Eccentric (November 2, 1997)

Finding the right college online, by Mike Wendland.

"Another source of financial aid information is the FinAid Web site (www.finaid.org). This isn't a very slick site. Don't expect multimedia and cool-looking animations. Instead, it's a collection of well-organized links to solid information and scholarship search enginees from the data bases of several different organizations. The FinAid site is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators and offers some excellent advice. Best of all, it's free. ... The FinAid site offers a very detailed report (www.finaid.org/finaid/scams.html) on scholarship scams. It's well worth the time to read."

Erie Daily Times (October 31, 1997)

Find those lottery numbers on the Net, by Tribune Media Services.

"Financial Aid Information Page - (http://www.finaid.org/). Mark Kantrowitz maintains this amazing collection of links to college financial aid information resources on the 'Net. The page directs visitors to over 500 resources in dozens of categories, including Lenders, Study Abroad, Loan Counselors, and US government Info. Resources are relevant to graduate and undergraduate students, and cover both science and liberal arts disciplines."

Norfolk Flagship (October 30, 1997)

Financial aid information, applications available on-line

"Why pay money to a scholarship search service when you can search some of the best scholarship and fellowship databases for free on the World Wide Web? The Financial Aid Information Page -- FinAid -- provides a free, comprehensive, independent, and objective guide to student financial aid. The page was created by Mark Kantrowitz, author of the Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships and is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. One of the hot links from this page is to the electronic Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA. The FAFSA is the foundation for all federal and most institutional financial aid. Visit FinAid on the World Wide Web at ."

Tampa Tribune (March 30, 1998)
Brunswick Times Record (October 24, 1997)
Watertown Daily Times (October 19, 1997)

Time Line for Seeking Financial Aid, Cox News Service.

"Use the Internet. Try FinAid, sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, http://www.finaid.org/."

Winnetka Talk (October 23, 1997)
Niles Herald-Spectator (October 23, 1997)
Maywood Herald (October 22, 1997)

Internet links students to many sources, by John Hammond.

"The best financial aid site is The Financial Aid Information Page, maintained by Mark Kantrowitz at Carnegie Mellon University. At this page, you can search for scholarships, estimate your financial aid eligibility for both public and private universities, estimate student loan payments, review federal and state aid programs and learn about the proliferation of financial aid scams."

Hudson Post-Gazette (October 23, 1997)

Financial Aid -- Just the basics

"In addition, there is now some very good free scholarship services available on the Internet. The address on the World Wide Web is http://www.finaid.org. ... In fact, if you want more detailed information on various general financial aid topics, browse around the 'finaid.org' pages!"

Beloit Daily News (October 21, 1997)

Sites teach about colleges over the web

"When considering ways to manage college costs, try FinAid, The Financial Aid Information Page (http://www.finaid.org/), which is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators."

Knoxville News-Sentinel (October 13, 1997)

Internet has education sites, by David Keim.

"Students can surf the Internet to find scholarships, school information, and advice on higher education. ... Financial Aid Homepage: http://www.finaid.org offers guidance through the financial aid process, scholarship searches, and career planning information."

Newark Sunday Star-Ledger (October 12, 1997)

Filing for dollars often becomes time well spent, by Kimberly Howell.

"The World Wide Web is riddled with free information and databases concerning financial aid, including these sites: ... www.finaid.org - A site provided by financial aid administrators."

Des Moines Sunday Register (October 12, 1997)

Seeking financial aid information? Try on-line, by Julia Johnston.

"the Iowa College Student Aid Commission recommends tuning into an Internet Web site that is like a one-stop supermarket crammed with easy-to-get information. The address is http://www.finaid.org/ and it's sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. "

University Daily Kansan (October 9, 1997)

Web site untangles financial-aid woes, by Melissa Ngo.

"Thanks to a web site devoted to financial aid for students, students like Casson can determine their loan payments via the Internet. The web site was created by Mark Kantrowitz, a research scientist and the author of three books including the Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students. "I created the site to help people," Kantrowitz said. "Financial Aid is confusing because of its complexity and specialized jargon." Chris Johnson, associate director at the Office of Student Financial Aid, said that the site was the best source for all information about financial aid. The web site's address is http://www.finaid.org. ... "It is very broad-based with links to many other useful sites," Johnson said. "It's a one-stop starting place for students looking for financial aid." The web site has links that range from sites for individual school financial aid to sites that will calculator how long it would take to pay off a student loan. The web site also offers a "preliminary need analysis" to determine a student's eligibility for scholarships, grants, and loans. Casson said he used the site to determine how much interest he would have to pay on his student loans. ... Johnson encouraged students to visit both Kantrowitz' site and that of the office."

Troy Record (October 7, 1997)
Birmingham Times (September 25, 1997)
"Colleges themselves, along with state and federal agencies, are among the most fruitful sources of grants. If you can access the Internet, contact the Financial Aid Information Page at http://www.finaid.com."

Orlando Sentinel (October 5, 1997)

Planning for college? Set your savings goals early, by Gary Klott.

"To estimate what percentage of the costs you'll have to pay, fill out a financial aid worksheet. Several Internet sites provide worksheets that automatically make the calculations, including the Financial Aid Information Page at www.finaid.org."

Potomac News (October 4, 1997)

Ways to maximize your college financial aid, by Cox News Service.

"Use the Internet. Try FinAid, sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, http://www.finaid.org/."

Vanguard (Portland State University) (October 1, 1997)

Hidden resources available for financing education, by Amanda Derheimer.

"Ross recommends as one of the best on-line resources: http://www.finaid.org"

Frost Illustrated (October 1, 1997)

Tomorrow's job is in the homework you do today.

"Colleges themselves, along with state and federal agencies, are among the most fruitful sources of grants. If you can access the Internet, contact the Financial Aid Information Page at http://www.finaid.com."

Central Florida Family (October 1997)

www.financialhelp.please, by Matthew Gomez.

"Internet access is not universally enjoyed, but families with home computers have already discovered the ease in which finances may be outlined through budgeting and investment software applications. Now, a variety of Internet sites exist that may help families better plan their financial savings and investment portfolio. ... Following are a sampling of financial websites that may aid in planning the family's financial future: www.finaid.org This website is of great use to families seeking financial aid to finance higher education. Convenient access to information about available scholarships, grants and loans for private high schools, colleges and graduate schools."

Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel (September 27, 1997)
Champaign News-Gazette (September 25, 1997)

Tuition hikes slow, financial aid jumps, by Gary Klott.

"To estimate what percentage of the costs you'll likely have to pay, fill out a financial aid worksheet. There are several Internet sites that provide worksheets that automatically make the calculations, including the Financial Aid Information Page at (www.finaid.org). ... The Internet site, as well as financial software programs such as Quicken, include calculators for projecting how much you'd need to save each month in order to pay your share of the costs."

Peoria Journal Star (September 25, 1997)

Easing the pain of college costs, by John O'Connell.

"the web site for the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (www.finaid.org) has a built-in calculator that allows parents to determine college costs right in their own homes."

Walpole Times (September 25, 1997)

Fall is the time to check out the library

"Financial Aid ... A new source of information is the Web. Like most areas of the web the range and quality of information is enormous and varied. There is no easy, quick way to dig out information. Be prepared to spend a large amount of time. Two excellent starting points are FinAid (www.finaid.org) and FastWEB (www.fastweb.com). The FinAid site is huge and comprehensive. Sort of a Yahoo for financial aid, it arranges, by category, links to many other useful sources. Especially noteworthy is its section on 10 myths of hunting down aid. This is must reading before you pay a company to tap into those publicized "billions of dollars of unclaimed aid". ... Both sites are free and updated frequently."

Birmingham Times (September 25, 1997)

Your Money & You

"If you can access the Internet, contact the Financial Aid Information Page at http://www.finaid.com"

Western Front (Western Washington University) (September 22, 1997)

Top places that show you the money, by Arlene Frazier.

"The Financial Aid Information Page is a reliable source and an excellent starting point that offers a comprehensive, free guide to student financial aid. The FinAid page has links to some of the largest free scholarship search services on the Internet."

Sunday Tribune Review (September 21, 1997)

Surfing the Web for College Dollars, provided by Business Week.

"The Financial Aid Information Page - Great source of general information from the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, plus an especially rich variety of online calculators. Web address: www.finaid.org"

San Luis Obispo New Times (September 18, 1997)

The Ultimate College Website Guide (Or: Everything You Need to Know About Everything)

"FinAid: The Financial Aid Information Page (www.finaid.org). Clear explanations and tons of links make this one a worthy bookmark. No surprises here, but if you're falling deeper into the Wonderful World of Debt, this is a good independent guide to student financial aid. Includes sources of aid, "scam alerts", a question-and-response section, and leads to mailing lists and news groups. And thankfully, this isn't one of the "free" services that sells your address to corporations for a mailing list."

North Clermont Community Journal (September 17, 1997)
Cincinnati Delhi Press (September 17, 1997)

Financing today's college education, by Catherine Hershberger.

"Students can also access scholarship information on the web. Mark Kantrowitz, author of the Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students, has a web page that provides a free scholarships resource network. Students can check it out at http://www.finaid.org."

Orange County Register (September 16, 1997)

A Parents' Guide

"The best place to find out about scholarships is on the Internet. You should also check with local community groups and with your child's high schools. (Recommended Web sites: Financial Aid Information Page at http://www.finaid.org and fastWEB at www.fastweb.com.)"

Ventura County Star (September 15, 1997)

Scholarships.com, by Holly K. Hacker.

"A good place to start looking for college money is The Financial Aid Information Page, www.finaid.org. It has an alphabetical index of all financial aid resources on the Web, as well as links to free scholarship and fellowship databases. It also has calculators to estimate your expected family contribution and financial need. Sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. "

St. Petersburg Times (September 14, 1997)

Saving and Paying for College, by Helen Huntley.

"You can get an estimate of your expected family contribution using worksheets found in college planning books or -- even better -- one of the financial aid calculators available on the Internet (try http://www.finaid.org)."

Traverse City Record-Eagle (September 9, 1997)

Internet a resource for planning strategy

"One of the best resources for planning financial aid strategy is "FinAid: The Financial Aid Information Page" on the Web (http://www.finaid.org). FinAid describes in depth how colleges determine financial need, provides a form for students to estimate their Expected Family Contribution (EFC), and offers links to several databases providing free searches of private scholarship sources."

Newsday (Nassau Edition) (September 7, 1997)

e-mail tricks, by Bob Rankin.

"FINANCIAL AID INFORMATION: The Financial Aid FAQ compiled by Mark Kantrowitz is said to be the most comprehensive guide to higher education financial aid."

Atlanta Journal & Atlanta Constitution (September 7, 1997)
Warren Tribune Chronicle (September 8, 1997)

Ask the Fool.

"Check out www.finaid.org and www.fastweb.com for help with financial aid and scholarships."

Modesto Bee (September 2, 1997)

Ride wave of financial aid, by Cindy Peterson.

"... scholarship hunting is also overwhelming ... if I were a techno-rookie parent, I'd rather sweep out my garage with a toothbrush than go online to research financial aid. Hold your brushes. To the rescue come two great Web resources: The US Dept. of Education (www.ed.gov) and FinAid (www.finaid.org). ... The second scholarship resource is FinAid at www.finaid.org. This site is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA). Its contents are shepherded by Mark Kantrowitz, author of Prentice Hall's Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students. Mark must have a sense of humor, because research here can be fun. The homepage is a sea of underlined type, linking to just about anything you need: sources of aid, loan information, and special interest scholarship programs. Even more helpful is his "Mark's Picks" page. This launch pad reaches a dozen loan calculators, a handful of free scholarship search services, publications, and Ask the Aid Advisor. It's wonderful. The Aid Advisor is a volunteer network of financial aid administrators and professionals who answer questions from students and parents."

Winchester Star (August 28, 1997)

'FinAid' is useful source for info on financial aid

"Students and their parents who are looking for information on financial aid for college will find the 'FinAid' site on the Internet a valuable resource. This page provides a free, comprehensive, independent and objective guide to student financial aid. It is maintained by Mark Kantrowitz, author of The Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students, and is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA). It includes information on scholarships, fellowships, grants, loans, and prepaid tuition plans, a list of financial aid office web pages, information for special interests such as minority, female, gay and lesbian, and disabled students, a 'scam alert', and formulas for calculating financial need. This site is located on the Internet at www.finaid.com. It is one of the useful sites that can be found with the use of the Winchester Public Library's Internet connection."

USA Today (August 27, 1997)
Danville Commercial News (August 31, 1997)
Tennessean (November 24, 1997)

Internet can be link to financial aid, by Pat Ordovensky, USA Today.

"A massive on-line library of financial aid information and advice is The Financial Aid Information Page, maintained by Mark Kantrowitz of Carnegie Mellon University for the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. It includes links to search services, tuition payment plans, student loan vendors, and college Web sites. Go to http://www.finaid.org."

Hayes Daily News (August 24, 1997)

The Internet offers what library can't, with some limitations, by Avery Fischer.

"http://www.finaid.com (The Financial Aid Information Page). Maintained by educational author Mark Kantrowitz, it ... offers info on numerous sources of aid, an explanation on scholarship search scams, and links to Internet aid databases. Includes calculators to help students and parents design a college savings plan."

Trenton Times (August 24, 1997)

Back to School: NJO's Top 20 Internet Destinations for Students, Parents, and Families

New Jersey Online ranked FinAid as #3. "3. FinAid, The Financial Aid Page (www.finaid.org). A free, comprehensive guide to student financial aid."

Tallahassee Democrat (January 25, 1998)
Miami Herald (November 2, 1997)
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (September 8, 1997)
Charlotte Observer (August 25, 1997)
Boca Raton News (August 18, 1997)
Albuquerque Sunday Journal (August 17, 1997)
Hagerstown Herald-Mail (August 17, 1997)
Virginian-Pilot (August 13, 1997)

Where to check if you need to borrow money for college, Knight-Ridder Newspapers.

"FinAid Web site: http://www.finaid.org. Comprehensive site that provides an objective guide to student financial aid. Sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, this Web page also offers a host of select links to other student loan related sites."

Lantern (Ohio State University) (August 21, 1997)

Web page lends help to students, by Takako Kaida.

"The Financial Aid Information Page recently added a new section which provides advice to students whose parents won't file financial aid application forms or help them pay their tuition. ... The page provides tips on how students can convince parents to help -- such as what to do if parents refuse to complete financial aid forms. The page also covers the options available to students if their parents don't want to take out loans to pay for education. ... The goal of the web page is to help parents understand that the federal government and the school consider it the family's responsibility to pay for a child's education."

Newton Graphic (August 21, 1997)
Franklin Country Gazette (September 10, 1997)
Franklin Country Gazette (August 20, 1997)

Get focused on financial aid

"Research available scholarships at your local library or log on to http://www.finaid.org/ on the Internet."

Sulphur Times-Democrat (August 21, 1997)

Financial Aid Office Uses Electronic Advances To Help Students

"The Financial Aid Information Page, sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, is accessible from the OSU Financial Aid page and includes information about all types of financial aid opportunities."

Dallas Morning News (August 19, 1997)

Scholarships await right applicants, by Jayne Noble Suhler.

"Students should also tap into financial aid World Wide Web sites such as www.finaid.org, which is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators and gives free information about scholarships, fellowships, grants, and contests."

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (August 17, 1997)

Paying for college is an education in itself, by Alan J. Borsuk.

"The Internet offers loads of information. Numerous sites offer financial aid advice. Among them: www.finaid.org The site of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators."

Columbus Dispatch (August 17, 1997)

Investing 101: How to save so you can put your kid through college, by Harvey D. Shapiro, New York Times Special Features.

"If you are shopping for information on strategies for paying for college, here are a few sites on the Internet that offer valuable data. FINAID: The Financial Aid Information Page www.finaid.org ... useful information on types and sources of aid with many links to other sites."

St. Paul Pioneer Press (August 10, 1997)

Dial up aid information via computer.

"Looking for help in your search for financial aid information? One of the first places to turn may be your computer. Here is a sampling of sites that can provide assistance. www.finaid.org. This page is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. It's maintained by Mark Kantrowitz, author of The Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students. You'll find information on sources of aid, aid for special interests (minority, older, international, etc.), government help, and more. There are even calculators and discussion groups. And it links to other financial aid databases -- all of which are free."

Muskegon Chronicle (August 9, 1997)

College Finance 101, by Susan K. Treutler.

"Finding aid. College and high school counselors know where to go for money. If you want the latest info, plug into the Internet. The address is www.finaid.org and the site is endorsed by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators."

New Albany Tribune (August 7, 1997)

Home computers make it easier to fill out financial aid applications, by Chuck Malloy.

"Jeanne Saunders, who works with the Department of Education, remembers her college days when applying for loans and grants amounted to filling out an endless number of applications. ... If she has her way, it will get even easier on the Financial Aid Information page, also known as FinAid. ... However, there's more to the FinAid page than grant applications. ... The page gives everything from an overview of the grants and loans that are available as well as what individual schools are offering. FinAid even has a "scam alert" to warn students about bogus programs. "This really is one-stop shopping for those seeking financial aid," Saunders said. The information page may be accessed through http://www.finaid.org/."

New Albany Tribune (August 5, 1997)

Financial aid is available to those who ask the right questions, by Ben Schneider.

"One of the best up-to-date sources King has found for national scholarship information is the Internet, especially a page run by Mark Kantrowitz called FinAid at http://www.finaid.org. "Mark's page only gives the credible stuff", she said."

Albuquerque Sunday Journal (August 3, 1997)

Scholarship Fitness, by Lee Matthew.

"The National Association of Student Aid Administrators sponsors a Financial Aid Information Web site, at www.finaid.org. This independent guide to student financial aid provides information on many topics, including sources of aid; an EFC estimator, a loan payment calculator, and a "Scam Alert" page."

Olympian (August 1, 1997)
Palm Springs Desert Sun (June 17, 1997)
Saratogian (June 15, 1997)
Ithaca Journal (June 11, 1997)
Muskogee Daily Phoenix and Times Democrat (June 9, 1997)

Do your homework now for the new school year, by Gannet News Service.

"Fill out a financial aid work sheet online to get a ballpark figure on your expected contribution. Hartman recommends using an online worksheet run by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. The Web page is http://finaid.org."

Minneapolis Star Tribune (July 29, 1997)
Tallahassee Democrat (July 29, 1997)
Indianapolis Business Journal (July 28, 1997)
Midland Reporter-Telegram (June 21, 1997)
International Herald Tribune (Paris, France) (June 14, 1997)

College students find Net profits in the quest for financial aid, by Mylene Mangalindan, Bloomberg News.

"Many are turning to the Internet. About a million use the global computer network in their quest for a sliver of the $1 billion to $2 billion a year in private scholarship aid, said Mark Kantrowitz, creator of FinAid. The site, http://www.finaid.org/, one of several cropping up on the World Wide Web, is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators."

San Bernardino Sun (July 1, 1997)
USA Today (June 25, 1997)

Money: A major frustration for students, by Pat Ordovensky, Gannet News Service.

"Shunk and others recommend the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators site (http://www.finaid.org) as an excellent one-stop source of information."

Durham Herald-Sun (June 15, 1997)
Vacaville Reporter (June 11, 1997)
Berkshire Eagle (June 9, 1997)
Lakeland Ledger (June 7, 1997)

Surfing the Web for Financial Aid Gives Students an Edge, by Mylene Mangalindan, Bloomberg News.

"Many are turning to the Internet. About a million use the global computer network in their quest for a sliver of the $1 billion to $2 billion a year in private scholarship aid, said Mark Kantrowitz, creator of FinAid. The site, one of several cropping up on the World Wide Web, is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators."

USA Today (June 6, 1997)

Netting a more complete college picture, Mary Beth Marklein.

Ken Hartman recommended the FinAid Page as the top college web site for general financial aid information in an interview with Mary Beth Marklein. In particular, he recommended that parents "fill out a financial aid work sheet on line to get a ballpark figure on your expected contribution. Hartman recommends using an on-line work sheet run by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. The Web page is http://finaid.org"

Salt Lake Tribune (June 16, 1997)
Durham Herald-Sun (June 15, 1997)
Lorain Morning Journal (June 4, 1997)

Strategies for Surviving the '90s: Paying for College, by Pat Carr, Knight Ridder Tribune.

Pat Carr recommended the FinAid Page as one of five web sites for information about student financial aid, saying that it provides "Very useful info on types and sources of aid with many links to other sites".

Port Huron Times Herald (June 4, 1997)
Oakland Press (June 4, 1997)

Advisers can help families seek college financial aid, Kiplinger's.

"You can also compute your expected family contribution on your own using one of the on-line calculators at the Financial Aid Information page on the World Wide Web (http://www.finaid.org)."

Washington Post (May 30, 1997)
Ogden Standard-Examiner (June 29, 1997)
Brainerd Daily Dispatch (June 15, 1997)
Hartford Courant (June 12, 1997)

FAST FORWARD: The World's First Guide to the World Wide Web for Normal Human Beings

"Some web sites do one thing extremely well. ... Here we list the addresses of sites to click on to carry out singular but sometimes, urgent tasks. IF YOU WANT TO ... find financial aid for college, GO TO ... http://www.finaid.org"

Philadelphia Inquirer (May 25, 1997)

TAPping into college tuition, by Jeff Brown.

"There's an excellent discussion of prepaid tuition programs on the Internet at http://www.finaid.org/finaid/ptp.html"

Springfield News-Leader (May 4, 1997)

Let fingers do looking on computer, by Traci Shurley.

"FinAid (http://www.finaid.org/), a site sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, a consortium of 3,200 higher education institutions. FinAid includes 11 categories with subsections that cover everything from a financial aid scam alert to special scholarships for disabled students."

New York Daily News (May 4, 1997)

AnswerNet, by Arul Louis.

"Lots of Web sites offer information about scholarships, loans and other financial. Some of these sites also let you apply online for admission to many colleges. The most comprehensive site is the Financial Aid Information Page (http://www.finaid.com). It is run by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators."

New York Daily News (April 29, 1997)

Students' loudest cheer: Find me the money!.

"Don't overlook the hottest site on the Internet for financial aid tips: The Financial Aid Information Page (http://www.finaid.org/). Sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, it provides extensive scholarship databases and a parents' guide to funds for free.

Cleveland Plain Dealer (April 28, 1997)

Getting ahead by mousing around. An Internet connection can put financial data at your fingertips, by Chuck Melvin.

"With a college education now costing, officially, gazillions of dollars, many families need a little help. One good place to start: the Lakewood Public Library's Web site, which has collected links to some of the most helpful scholarship sites as well as gateways to the financial aid departments at 22 Ohio colleges and universities. ... Others to consider: http://www.finaid.org/"

San Diego Union-Tribune (April 25, 1997)

Colleges come a-courting high school students, by Lillian Salazar-Leopold.

"The Financial Aid Information Page. Parents and students can get the latest information on paying for college. http://www.finaid.org/"

Atlanta Journal (April 21, 1997)
Atlanta Constitution (April 21, 1997)

Today's topic: Financial aid.

"Resources: A good place to start on the Internet is the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators Website at http://www.finaid.org, which has extensive information on federal, state, and private forms of financial aid."

Ann Arbor News (April 16, 1997)

destination: college, by Jennifer Braunschweiger.

"Apply for financial aid. Start by filling out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), available at your guidance office, or surf the Financial Aid Information Page (www.finaid.org) for links to the form and scholarship resources."

Meriden Record-Journal (April 15, 1997)

Searching for cash in the financial aid maze, by Bob Dart, Cox News Service.

"Use the Internet. Try FinAid, sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, http://www.finaid.org/."

Lafayette Journal and Courier (April 14, 1997)

Scholarship advice: Start early, try often, by Max Showalter and Sean Hao.

"There's an excellent page of unbelievable resources and free research information," said Marvin Smith, manager of financial assistance services at Ivy Tech in Lafayette. ... The Internet page sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators can be found at www.finaid.org.

Univ. of Wisconsin Exponent (April 10, 1997)

Avoid loan sharks: Surf the web for college aid, by Craig Krueger.

"I.need.money.com may well be your most feasible way of searching for loans to pay those college bills. Since the World Wide Web has eclipsed everyone's expectations as an entertainment and information medium, it makes sense that it should offer some advice to students looking for a place to get a few bucks for school. FinAid (www.finaid.org), a site sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, offers an exhaustive guide to finding information about financial aid sources, protection from scams, common myths about financial aid and assistance for special interest groups. While the information is very useful, the site is very text-intensive which makes it a little difficult to navigate. ... There are numerous other sites scattered throughout the Web that are devoted to helping you find the best student loan, but FinAid and Sallie Mae offer the most comprehensive range of information."

Detroit Free Press (April 7, 1997)

Search is on for college money, by Peggy Walsh-Sarnecki.

"The National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators sponsors an Internet site offering a free scholarship search. The site also includes formulas similar to the federal formula, which provide an estimate of the family's expected contribution. The Internet address is www.finaid.org"

Dover Tab (April 1, 1997)

Tap into financial aid sources, by Don Seiffert.

"The Web site offers links to most other main sources of information of financial aid available on the Web, such as the Financial Aid Information Page at http://www.finaid.org/."

Richmond Times-Dispatch (March 30, 1997)

Watch out for fraud in scholarship search, by Paula Squires.

"The financial aid administrators also recommend a web site on the Internet (http://www.finaid.org). It's sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators and is maintained by Mark Kantrowitz, who has written a book on scholarships for math and science students. A visit to the site shows comprehensive information on just about any topic involving financial aid. There are explanations on common methods used to calculate financial aid along with free direct links to scholarship search data bases. ... This site and one maintained by the Federal Trade Commission (http://www.ftc.gov) also include information on fraudulent scholarship schemes and how to avoid them."

Rio Grande Sun (March 27, 1997)

Financial Aid Not That Unobtainable, by Gino Brazil.

"The information highway of the World Wide Web also offers students a new dimension for scholarship seeking. A one-stop shopping address for scholarship information is available through: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/afs/cs/user/mkant/Public/FinAid/finaid.html"

Altus Times (March 26, 1997)
Fort Smith Times Record (March 25, 1997)
Bakersfield Californian (March 22, 1997)
Chico Enterprise-Record (March 22, 1997)
Norman Transcript (March 22, 1997)
Big Pasture News (March 21, 1997)
Henryetta Daily Free Lance (March 20, 1997)

Finding the funding: Logging on can help you do college, by Melissa Jones, Donrey Media Group.

"One good place to check is FinAid: The Financial Aid Information Page, located at http://www.finaid.org/finaid.html. This site boasts a "free, comprehensive, independent and objective guide to student financial aid." And comprehensive, it is. The site not only provides a database of scholarships and grants available, but it also provides links to other financial aid sites and searchable databases to help you find something in your area. The site is divided into categories, such as loans, sources of aid, special interest, ... Don't forget to check out Mark's Picks under "Navigation". This will take you to a list and description of great links to help you find the right type of financial aid for you."

Elyria Chronicle-Telegram (March 21, 1997)

Thinking ahead?

"Looking for a college, or a career? Here's a list of web sites available via the Internet. ... The Financial Aid Information Page, http://www.finaid.org/. The National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators provides a free, comprehensive, independent, and objective guide to student financial aid.

Tacoma News Tribune (January 4, 1998)
Salinas Californian (April 7, 1997)
Chambersburg Public Opinion (April 7, 1997)
Carroll County Times (April 6, 1997)
Bellingham Herald (April 5, 1997)
Fremont News-Messenger (March 25, 1997)
The Tennessean (March 24, 1997)
Wilmington Sunday News Journal (March 23, 1997)
Tulsa World (March 23, 1997)
Sacramento Bee (March 20, 1997)
Huntington Herald-Dispatch (March 17, 1997)
Norwich Bulletin (March 17, 1997)
Muskogee Daily Phoenix & Times Democrat (March 17, 1997)
Poughkeepsie Journal (March 17, 1997)
Boston Sunday Herald (March 16, 1997)
Utica Observer-Dispatch (March 16, 1997)
Gainesville Times (March 16, 1997)
Niagara Gazette (March 16, 1997)
Sunday Montgomery Advertiser (March 16, 1997)
Battle Creek Enquirer (March 16, 1997)
Danville Commercial-News (March 16, 1997)
Monroe News-Star (March 16, 1997)

Mastering the scholarship game, by Ken Berzof and Bill Wolfe, Gannett News Service.

If you search for "college scholarships" on the Internet, you'll get thousands of matches. A good starting point is a financial-aid home page http://www.finaid.org/ that is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators.

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (March 16, 1997)

More money for college

"Looking for college scholarships? You might consider starting with the Internet. Check out a Web page sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. It has links to many other pages."

Sunday Denver Post (March 16, 1997)

Dollars and Sense: PC connection

"Financial Planning for Your Future. Sites include ... and the Financial Information Page (http://www.finaid.com) from the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators."

Jefferson Post (March 6, 1997)

Find financial assistance for college on the Internet, by S.J. Morgan.

"Know someone who wants to attend college but might need or want some financial assistance? Help can be found on the Web. ... Where do you start? May I suggest two places: your school counselor and the Web. You know where to find your counselor and I'm going to tell you where to start on the Internet. FinAid the Financial Aid Information Page: This site provides a free, objective and comprehensive guide to student financial aid. It is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. Just about any question you may have concerning aid can be answered here. ..."

Wyandotte-Trenton News-Herald (March 5, 1997)

Internet offers lots of college aid info, by Kitty Williams and Robin Lund.

"Start with the Financial Aid Information Page and proceed directly to Financial Aid Search Through the WEB (fastWEB)."

Central Kentucky News-Journal (March 3, 1997)

You don't have to pay search fees to obtain scholarship information.

"One of the quickest and most up to date ways to search for information on scholarships, as discussed in the first part of this series, is through the Internet. http://www.finaid.org/ This site provides a free, comprehensive, independent and objective guide to student financial aid and is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators."

Lawrence Eagle-Tribune (March 1, 1997)

Students scramble for aid, by Mary Beth Donovan.

"More Good Ideas. High school guidance offices often have a list of other aid opportunity and so do local libraries. To do a computer search, log on to http://www.finaid.org/ on the Internet."

Middletown Journal (March 26, 1997)
Carlisle Sentinel (March 23, 1997)
Jonesboro Sun (March 20, 1997)
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer (March 6, 1997)
Huntsville Times (March 1, 1997)
Decatur Herald & Review (February 27, 1997)
Orlando Sentinel (January 28, 1997)

How to find private scholarships, by Joni James, Knight-Ridder News Service.

"Surf the Internet. Online databases offer the most up-to-date lists. Search functions make the task efficient. One of the biggest financial aid sites is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators - www.finaid.org - which offers links to other sites."

Catholic Standard (February 27, 1997)

Web sites for financial aid.

"The Internet is full of information for students and their parents. There are many World Wide Web sites that offer information about college admissions, financial aid information, and other questions you may have. ... Financial Aid Information Page, Mark Kantrowitz: http://www.finaid.org/"

Warren Tribune Chronicle (March 2, 1997)
Salem News (February 24, 1997)
Lancaster Eagle-Gazette (February 17, 1997)

Scholarship money there for the taking, by Molly O'Reilly, Thomson News Service.

"The Internet contains several sites to aid students with scholarship searches. Here are free-access sites recommended by Danny Straub, guidance counselor at Dublin Scioto High School: FinAid: The Financial Aid Information Page http://www.finaid.org/"

Buffalo Business First (February 24, 1997)

Cast a wide net to gather financial aid information, by Frank Colantuono.

"An excellent site to visit is the Financial Aid Information Page (www.finaid.org), which is a free, independent, and objective guide to financial aid sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. This comprehensive site offers information on financial aid, a glossary of terminology, resource materials and frequently asked questions. The site also includes a collection of financial calendars, including programs to help estimate the amount parents are expected to pay for college under federal guidelines, various calculations on investments and even projections on the cost of tuition at your school of choice. Just plug in your financial data and the figures pop up on the screen."

Long Beach Sunday Press-Telegram (February 23, 1997)

Coping with College Costs, by Laura Flores.

"On the World Wide Web for Financial Aid Information: Financial Aid Information Page, http://www.finaid.org/"

Tallahassee Democrat (February 23, 1997)

Information Aids for Financial Aid, by Kim Koppe.

"Here are a few of the many sources of information for obtaining scholarships and other financial aid: ONLINE - The Financial Aid Information Page, http://www.finaid.org/, is sponsored by the National Association of Financial Aid Administrators. It contains information on scholarships and grants, as well as warnings about fraudulent search firms."

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette (February 23, 1997)

Cash for College, an advertising supplement published by the Arkansas Department of Higher Education.

"Like to surf the 'net? The Internet is an excellent source for financial aid information. Many schools have world wide web home pages on the Internet, including information on financial aid and links to other sources. One of the best sources of information is the Financial Aid Information Page, which is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA). It contains information on all types of scholarships and grants, has FREE scholarship searches, links to the federal government and other sources and information on scholarship scams. The web address is: http://www.finaid.org/."

Boston Globe (February 21, 1997)

Financial aid forms need not be intimidating, by Jo-Ann Johnston.

"Where to go for financial aid information: Internet scholarship searches, http://www.finaid.org/"

Jersey Journal (February 20, 1997)

Financial aid is available, if you know where to look, by Carol Silverman Saunders, Newhouse News Service.

"The Financial Aid Information Page, a non-profit, free service featuring scholarship and financial aid information: www.finaid.org"

Sun News (February 18, 1997)

Scholarship, financial aid process goes high-tech: Internet makes searches easier, by Lenore McKenzie Morris.

"http://www.finaid.org - This site provides links to many college financial aid sources and allows users to ask for counseling advice."

Dayton Daily News (February 17, 1997)

Find the funds, by Mark Fisher.

"For the most effective and comprehensive web site on the topic, Penick and other financial-aid specialists recommend the Financial Aid Information Page (http://www.finaid.org/), sponsored by the nonprofit National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, as the best first stop for prospective college students.

Navigating through that page and through the dozens of links to other resources the FinAid page contains, students and families can get an immediate, approximate idea of how much they or their families will be expected to pay toward their college education and how much in grants and loans they would likely qualify for. They can even get expert advice from financial-aid advisers to their individual questions through an "Ask the Aid Adviser" e-mail system."

El Paso Times (February 17, 1997)

Scramble is on for college aid, by Jim Weddell.

"Various Internet sites provide financial aid information. These provide links to others: FinAid: Links to various sites, including databases with more than 180,000 scholarships, fellowships, grants and loans. http://www.finaid.org"

Stockton Record (February 16, 1997)

Yes, there could be a scholarship just for you, by Tamma Adamek.

"A Web page sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators includes a service called "Ask the Aid Advisor" and an on-line searchable database of more than 180,000 scholarships: http://www.finaid.org"

Memphis Commercial Appeal (February 16, 1997)

High tuitions spawn aid industry, by Sarah A. Derks.

"Many lenders and higher education organizations offer World Wide Web sites filled with information on how to pay for college. Some sites include: ... http://www.finaid.org/ This site from the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators offers a complete guide to sources of funding, including loans and grants, scams to avoid, and other information."

Atlanta Journal/Atlanta Constitution (March 23, 1997)
Austin American-Statesman (March 23, 1997)
San Jose Mercury News (March 12, 1997)
Modesto Bee (March 12, 1997)
Hartford Courant (March 9, 1997)
Detroit News (February 25, 1997)
Pocono Record (February 19, 1997)
Chicago Tribune (February 18, 1997)
Schenectady Daily Gazette (February 17, 1997)
Denver Post (February 17, 1997)
Miami Herald (February 16, 1997)
Arizona Daily Star (February 16, 1997)
Dallas Morning News (February 16, 1997)
Newark Sunday Star-Ledger (February 16, 1997)
Oklahoma City Journal Record (February 14, 1997)
South Bend Tribune (February 13, 1997)
Los Angeles Times (February 14, 1997)

Web Aids in Search for Scholastic Help, by Kathy M. Kristof, Los Angeles Times Syndicate.

"The Financial Information Page sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (http://www.finaid.com) offers a massive directory of financial aid information and links to hundreds of related sites at colleges, universities, the federal government, and lenders. ... it's one-stop shopping. In a matter of a few hours, you can collect information on everything from college application requirements to student loans to scholarship scams. Many colleges will even allow you to apply to the school -- and for aid -- online. If you've been procrastinating on those college applications, this makes it simple to get going. And the computerized financial aid search is light-years easier than pre-Web alternatives, which boil down to spending days in public libraries and weeks waiting for government financial aid booklets to arrive in the mail."

Los Angeles Times (February 10, 1997)

Looking High and Low for Tuition Help, by Nick Anderson.

"One useful World Wide Web site is the Financial Aid Information Page, at http://www.finaid.org, sponsored by a national group of financial aid officers."

Raleigh News & Observer (February 10, 1997)

Scaling the tuition barrier by Kyle York Spencer.

"Here are some resources for students seeking ways to finance a college education. Use your computer: The Financial Aid Information Page (http://www.finaid.org) is sponsored by the National Association of Financial Aid Administrators. It contains information on scholarships and grants, as well as warnings about fraudulent search firms. The association has another site (http://www.nasfaa.org) that offers consumer scholarship tips."

Clarions Call (February 6, 1997)

Cyberspace seminar held by Jeff Levkulich.

"Also discussed at the seminar were financial aid websites. The National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA) has an informing financial aid web page called FinAid."

St. Louis Post-Dispatch (February 5, 1997)

Aid For Parents Who Need Financial Aid, by Jane Schoenfeld.

"If you have access to the Internet at home in school or at your local public library branch, try the following World Wide Web sites: http://www.finaid.org/ (maintained by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators or NASFAA)"

Morristown Daily Record (February 2, 1997)

More Web sites to explore.

"There are plenty of serious-minded, grassroots-style Web pages out there in cyberspace devoted to women. ... Here's a listing of some sites for women suggested by local women and Internet magazines: ... Parenting ... FinAid: The Financial Aid Information Page (http://www.finaid.org). Help estimating the amount of aid you might qualify for and linking you to scholarship and fellowship sites."

Abilene Reporter-News (February 2, 1997)

Students shouldn't be fooled by promises of cash on the Net, by Brian Bethel.

"... Sites such as FinAid: The Financial Aid Information Page (www.finaid.org) provide students with a free, comprehensive view of everything from loans to personal finance, special interest funds and need calculators. ..."

Houston Computer Currents (January, 1997)

Finding Money for College on the Internet, by Art Shiver.

"Every high school counselor should be familiar with the site called FinAid (www.finaid.com). It is the Financial Aid Information Page maintained by Mark Kantrowitz, the author of The Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students, created the FinAid page as a public service. ... The point here is the FinAid page is legitimate and should be your first stop in looking for college money on the Internet. Linking from the FinAid page will take you to most of the Internet addresses you need to make your search. In addition, you will find tips on books and free brochures you can send for. ... Financial Aid Home Page - www.finaid.com - This is the most important Internet address when searching for loans and scholarships. When it comes to finding out about student financial aid, Mark Kantrowitz rules!"

Valley News Dispatch (January 27, 1997)

On the trail of financial aid, by Wynne Everett.

"Mark Kantrowitz, who was flooded with financial aid questions after leaving his e-mail address at the back of a 1993 book he wrote about scholarships, manages an Internet home page with information about financial aid. ... The National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators sponsors Kantrowitz's Web page."

Detroit News and Free Press (January 26, 1997)

The Road to College: Financial Aid

"Internet Sources: www.finaid.com - FinAid, sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, provides information on financial aid and links to hundreds of scholarship sites."

Boston Sunday Globe (January 26, 1997)

Shopping for college money the painless way, by Bob Weinstein.

"That's not all. A wealth of financial aid information is also available on the Internet. Barkowitz recommends visiting the Washington, DC-based National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators' (NASFAA) Web site (Http://www.finaid.org) to find out about more than 200,000 private scholarships. 'All you do is plug in personal and financial information, and the search matches you with an appropriate scholarship,' says Barkowitz. The site also offers an Expected Family Contribution estimator page, which can tell what the federal government will expect you to pay for college based upon your income."

Oakland Tribune (January 26, 1997)
Tri-Valley Herald (January 26, 1997)
Alameda Times-Star (January 26, 1997)
Fremont Argus (January 26, 1997)
Tuition: The price of success, by Mary Rajkumar.

"Internet sites with useful information: Web page sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. It includes a service called "Ask the Aid Advisor" and an online searchable database of more than 180,000 scholarships: www.finaid.org. There's also a web page on the Internet that allows parents to estimate their expected family contribution to college costs: www.finaid.org/finaid/calculators/estimate.html"

Denison Review (January 24, 1997)

Financial aid info on Internet

"Valuable college financial aid information and college application forms can be located on the Internet. ... Listed below is one address that might prove worthwhile to take some time to explore the opportunities: Address: http://www.finaid.org/"

Centre Daily Times (December 4, 1997)
San Bernardino Sun (March 3, 1997)
Delta Democrat Times (February 26, 1997)
Delta Democrat Times (February 12, 1997)
Delta Democrat Times (January 22, 1997)
Mobile Register (January 22, 1997)
Mobile Press (January 22, 1997)
Rochester Democrat and Chronicle (January 22, 1997)
Rochester Times-Union (January 22, 1997)
Pine Bluff Commercial (January 21, 1997)

Apply yourself. Three good ways to get financial assistance: Apply, apply, apply, by Knight-Ridder News Service.

"The National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators offers a comprehensive Web site that includes tips on avoiding financial aid scams. Calculators are included to help students determine aid eligibility."

Connecticut Post (April 24, 1997)
Pharos-Tribune (March 17, 1997)
Monroe News-Star (March 9, 1997)
Dubuque Telegraph Herald (February 20, 1997)
Idaho Falls Post Register (February 19, 1997)
Terre Haute Tribune-Star (February 17, 1997)
Seymour Tribune (February 10, 1997)
Chicago Tribune (February 10, 1997)
Crawfordsville Journal Review (February 7, 1997)
Anchorage Daily News (January 23, 1997)
Orange County Register (January 16, 1997)

College aid, right under your nose, by Kimberly Kindy.

"The National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators offers an information page. The comprehensive Web site includes tips on avoiding financial-aid scams. Calculators are included to help students determine aid eligibility. http://www.finaid.org/"

Dallas Morning News (January 20, 1997)

At Work on the Web

"Financial Aid. If you're thinking about going to college and need assistance, you might want to check out the Financial Aid Information Page at www.finaid.com. The page is maintained by Mark Kantrowitz, the author of the Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students, and it's sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. The site features tools for calculating the amount of aidyou'll need. And it's not just for students, either. If you're looking for a break from work, for instance, the site offers details on fellowships, too."

Indiana Gazette (January 19, 1997)

Check out the sites

"FinAid - The Financial Aid Information Page provides a free, comprehensive, independent, and objective guide to student financial aid. The site is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA). Look it up at http://www.finaid.org/"

Newark Sunday Star-Ledger (January 19, 1997)

Research key to finding sources of funding, by Carol Silverman Saunders.

"Try searching for web sites of colleges in which you are interested. Most colleges now have sites and often list financial aid information. Use the following Web sites to access links to banks, lenders, and loan service agencies that want to lend money for college. The Financial Aid Information Page, a non-profit, free service featuring scholarship and financial aid information: www.finaid.org"

Huntington Herald-Dispatch (January 12, 1997)

Time dwindles for students looking for aid, by Melissa Rake.

"Internet can help: It's never too early to start planning for college. The Internet can help you tap into numerous sources. Try these web sites: http://www.finaid.org/ ..."

Des Moines Sunday Register (January 12, 1997)

Internet offers college aid information, by Thomas R. O'Donnell.

"These Internet World Wide Web addresses may be helpful for prospective college students and their parents who are seeking financial aid information: FinAid, the Financial Aid Information Page, http://wwww.finaid.org/"

Sunday Cape Cod Times (January 12, 1997)

Look for scholarships the smart way.

"Want to save yourself $49.95, $69.95, $109.95? Stay away from companies that offer -- for a fee -- to send you a list of private scholarship applications, advises Troy Davis, a Stonehill College financial aid officer. ... ''It's time right now and probably past time to be applying for those scholarships,'' Davis said. ''Save yourself some money and do it this way: www.finaid.org''."

Buffalo News (January 7, 1997)

How to find a scholarship.

"''Unclaimed scholarships are a myth,'' says Kalman Chany, author of the Princeton Review Guide for Paying for College. He recommends using legitimate channels: The National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (www.finaid.org); ..."

Washington Post (January 6, 1997)

Consummate Consumer: In Search of Student Financial Aid, by Janet Rohan.

"Important phone numbers and Web page addresses to help avoid financial aid hassles include: The Financial Aid Information Page, maintained by Mark Kantrowitz, who is currently studying at Carnegie Mellon, provides a "free, comprehensive, independent and objective guide to financial aid" mailing lists, newsgroups, sources of aid, loan information, and special interest groups, including international students, females, minorities, graduate students, veteran, private high school, national service, scholarship search services; http://www.finaid.org/"

1996

Cleveland Parent (December, 1996)

Choosing a College; It Just Got Easier.

"Looking for financial aid? Check out the Financial Aid Information Page (www.finaid.org) and FASTWEB (www.fastweb.com). The first site can also help with long-range savings planning. Simply plug in your financial data and the program will come up with cost projections."

Tampa Tribune (December 23, 1996)

Favorite Web Sites, by Frank Ruiz.

"http://www.finaid.org/ - Another useful site for college-bound students, The Financial Aid Information Page is sponsored by the National Association of Financial Aid Administrators. It contains information on scholarships and grants, as well as warnings about fraudulent search firms. The association has another site (http://www.nasfaa.org) that offers consumer scholarship tips."

San Diego Computer Edge (December 13, 1996)

Distance Learning and the Internet, by Joe San Filippo.

"The National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators sponsors a page full of links to information on financial aid at http://www.finaid.org/. This page is maintained by Mark Kantrowitz, author of The Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students. "

Cleveland Sun Courier (December 12, 1996)

Internet becomes fertile source for an info search, by Bruce Hammond.

The Financial Aid Info Page. "This site is an absolute must for anyone who needs financial aid. It covers every angle of the aid search, and includes links to all the other good financial aid sites."

St. Paul Pioneer Press (November 30, 1996)

Dollars and Sense.

"Need money for education? The Financial Aid Information Page, which is on the World Wide Web (http://www.finaid.org) is sponsored by the National Association of Financial Aid Administrators. It contains information on scholarships and grants, as well as warnings about fraudulent search firms."

Roanoke Times (November 29, 1996)

Questions, answers on prepaid tuition, by Warren Fiske.

"Experts say a good place to start, if you have access to a computer, is the home page offered by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. The web site is http://www.finaid.org/"

Navy Times (November 18, 1996)
Air Force Times (November 18, 1996)

The search is on. Internet adds new dimension to hunt for money, by Pamela M. McBride.

"At least three major search engines -- Yahoo, Excite, and Infoseek -- can steer you easily to home pages that describe financial aid. ... In addition, here are some specific home pages you can call up directly. FinAid (The Financial Aid Information Page), at http://www.finaid.org/."

Florence Morning News (November 17, 1996)

Parents face tuition blues. Financial aid allows students to beat rising college costs, by Bailey Webb.

"On the Internet, there are several sites that provide a great deal of information. Sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, FinAid at http://www.finaid.org/ offers a comprehensive guide to financial aid."

San Jose Mercury News (November 13, 1996)

A stunning guide to financial aid, by Mark Schwanhausser.

"It's Web sites like FinAid that make me wonder what life was like before the Internet. Maintained by financial-aid author Mark Kantrowitz and sponsored by a non-profit association comprised of 3,200 educational organizations, it offers a commendable guide to help you conjure up ways to pay for college. It offers a broad range of information and materials. It has 15 calculators to figure out college costs, savings goals, insurance needs, financial-aid estimates and loans. It allows you to submit questions to aid pros. And perhaps best of all, it provides FastWEB, which sifts through a database of more than 180,000 private scholarships for those you might qualify for - a free service for which other companies charge up to $10. Its URL is http://www.finaid.org/"

San Diego Union-Tribune (November 12, 1996)

Scholars flock to Web sites, CD-ROMs, by Matt Miller.

"Financial aid is a major concern for parents and students. For some idea of who's offering what cash, try the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (http://www.finaid.com)."

The New York Times (November 3, 1996)

Information Aids for Financial Aid

"Here are a few of the many sources of information for obtaining scholarships and other financial aid: The Financial Aid Information Page, which is on the World Wide Web (http://www.finaid.org/) is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. It contains information on scholarships and grants, as well as warnings about fraudulent search firms."

The Jewish Voice (October 25, 1996)
"The National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators now sponsors a World Wide Web homepage with financial aid and scholarship information. The address is http://www.finaid.org/"

USA Today (October 24, 1996)
In an article about the USA Today financial aid hot line, Pat Ordovensky listed only one web site, the FinAid Page, in a sidebar about sources of additional information, writing "Detailed information on financial aid, including a calculator for estimated family contribution; from National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators; http://www.finaid.org/".

Christian Science Monitor (September 30, 1996)

Fellowships Open Doors in Student Lives, by Kirsten A. Conover.

"But perhaps the best place to start is online: The Financial Aid Information Page (http://www.finaid.org) and FASTWEB on the World Wide Web are excellent resources with bibliographies, links to other sites, and helpful information about personal finance."

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (September 22, 1996)
"Way Cool Web Sites. Where to Go for Good Surfing. ... FinAid: Everything you ever wanted to know about student financial aid from Pittsburgher Mark Kantrowitz. http://www.finaid.org/"

Philadelphia Inquirer (September 19, 1996)

Thinking about college? Cast a wide Net, by Joyce Kasman Valenza.

The following comments appeared in a review of The Internet Guide for College-Bound Students, a book written by Kenneth Hartman and published by the College Board.

"Hartman had nothing but praise for the FinAid Page. ... The project is now monumental. Kantrowitz's award-winning Web site, FinAid: The Financial Aid Information Page, is the largest and most popular site of its sort on the Web. A true Netizen, his hobby is continued out of pure altruism and eats up forty hours a week. ... Far more than a directory, all of his pointers are carefully annotated. There are glossaries, overview articles, and an impressive group of calculators. Kantrowitz's calculators are "free, accurate, and completely confidential." They do such wonders as: project future college costs, estimate life insurance needs and the amount of debt a student could reasonably afford given the expected starting salary for a major. ... FinAid has received rave reviews from Time, the Wall Street Journal, Money and USA Today. ... The site features a panel of professional advisers who volunteer to help answer students' and parents' financial-aid questions. ... Kantrowitz's altruism extends to his latest project - working with the Federal Trade Commission to track scholarship scams, which he notes are rampant."

College Press Service (September 19, 1996)
An article by Sunni DeNicola appeared in Ka Leo O Hawaii, the student newspaper at the University of Hawaii, and several other college papers.

"The World Wide Web can ease a student's search for scholarships. The FinAid web site at http://wwww.finaid.org/ provides a host of information about financial aid. The site, which is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, includes links to more than 500 web pages."

USA Today (September 17, 1996)

FTC cracks down on scholarship search scams, by Dennis Kelly.

"... But Mark Kantrowitz, a Pittsburgh resident who runs a Web site on financial aid (http://www.finaid.org/), estimates there are 100 to 200 scam firms that have bilked 350,000 students nationwide. He bases that on the volume of inquiries he sees on his site. ..."

Signs of a shady operation.

"... Mark Kantrowitz, who runs an Internet Web site on financial aid out of his Pittsburgh home, also says to beware the standard pitch of these companies that there is $6.6 billion in financial aid that goes unclaimed each year. That number is based on a 20-year-old study and refers largely to college money from private employers available only to their employees and not the general public, Kantrowitz says. The $6.6 billion figure "is a myth", he says. "My impression is there's less than a couple of million dollars unclaimed each year." ..."

USA Today (September 12, 1996)

The Net: What's new and notable, by Sam Vincent Meddis.

"A wealth of financial aid information is a mouse click away at FinAid, courtesy of Mark Kantrowitz, author of The Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students."

The FinAid Page was also named a USA Today hot site on Tuesday, August 27, 1996.

The Wall Street Journal (August 29, 1996)

Watching the Web, by Thomas E. Weber and Robin Frost.

"FinAid: The Financial Aid Information Page. This comprehensive guide to financial-aid resources includes details on non-federal sources of financial aid, special information for minority and disabled students, and news on study-abroad programs. There's also a helpful set of calculators for crunching tuition costs and loan payments: Users simply fill in the blanks and let the Web site do the math."

Half Moon Bay Review (August 28, 1996)

Internet can help find school funding, by Wendell Cayton.

"I want to tell you about a most remarkable Web page where you can find just about everything you need to know about financial aid and financing for your children's college education. I found this page by doing a Yahoo search for "family expected contribution." The search found at least 10 sites dedicated to discussions on EFC, or the methodology approved by the federal government for qualification for financial aid. The best Web site in the bunch is http://www.finaid.org/. This site is a free collection of student financial aid information maintained by Mark Kantrowitz, the author of The Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students. The page is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. ... This site contains an excellent example of an EFC estimator. This is the first place you should visit. By following the instructions, you can quickly calculate if your financial situation qualifies for financial aid. ... I found his detailed coverage on scholarship and financial aid scams to be particularly interesting and a "must read" for parents and students. ... It is one of the best examples of how the Internet works to dispense a wealth of information at no cost."

The New York Times (August 12, 1996)
"A noted industry observer, Mr. Kantrowitz maintains a free Web site, sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, that advises students about scholarship hunting."

The Richmond Times Dispatch (July 8, 1996, Metro Business, Page D-19)

Web Can Make College Selection Less Stressful, by Kitty Williams and Robin Lind.

"... For most students, the question is, "Where should I go?" For most parents, the question is, "Can we afford it?"

One thing students and parents can do to answer those questions is to conduct some research, and there's no better place to start than the World Wide Web.

... There's plenty of good financial aid information on the Web, however, and there are many useful tools, including calculators and online search engines. ...

Start with the Financial Aid Information Page and proceed directly to Financial Aid Search Through the WEB (fastWEB). It is a free, searchable databases of "more than 180,000 private sector scholarships, fellowships, grants, and loans," produced by the Financial Aid Information Page and Student Services, Inc.

... Once you've set up your mailbox, go back to the Financial Aid Information Page, maintained by Mark Kantrowitz, author of The Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students. It is crammed with useful links.

On the Table of Contents page you'll find calculators, glossaries, directories of university financial aid Web pages, government documents, and links to information about scholarships, fellowships, grants, and loans. Be sure to visit The Student Guide 1996-1997: Financial Aid from the Department of Education, which will help you better understand such important esoterica as FAFSA, Federal Work-Study, Pell Grants, Perkins Loans, Stafford Grants, PLUS Loans, and more.

The information is out there, and you don't have to leave your keyboard to get it."

USA Today (April 17, 1996, Life, Page 4-D)

Tips on finding the funding for school, by Mary Beth Marklein.

"Surf the Net. One of the most comprehensive sites was developed by Carnegie Mellon University grad student Mark Kantrowitz. The address is ..."

Chicago Tribune (April 11, 1996, News, Page 1)

Needed: Degree of Persistence - College Financial Aid May Be Lurking Off The Beaten Path, by Tara Gruzen.

"I have yet to hear of any scholarships which went unused," said Mark Kantrowitz, who runs "FinAid", widely acknowledged as the most comprehensive Internet site for financial aid information. "Most scholarship programs are oversubscribed."

The Detroit News (July 17, 1996, Cyberia)
Fort Wayne News-Sentinel (April 6, 1996)
Knoxville News-Sentinel (March 31, 1996)
Sun-Sentinel (March 31, 1996, Lifestyle, Page 1E)

Get Money for College, Roadside Attractions Along the Information Highway, by Dave Farrell, roadside@branch.com, Universal Press Syndicate.

"If you have college-bound children, you're probably spending a lot of time worrying about the high cost of education.

Stop worrying and start surfing. Cyberspace is filled with all kinds of information about scholarships, loans, and grants. Here's a crash-course on where to find the best on the Net.

Your first stop should be at the mother of all college financial aid sites, FinAid: The Financial Aid Information Page. The only thing wrong with this place is its URL, which is almost as long as a scholarship application form: ...

This site is maintained by Mark Kantrowitz, author of The Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students. Mark also is a PhD candidate at Carnegie Mellon University. This site could be considered a graduate course in getting college aid.

He has posted on-line financial aid calculators to help you figure out how much college will cost and how much you'll have to save to pay for it.

He offers information on scholarships for just about everyone - disabled students, minority and women students, foreign students, and even older students.

He even has a section on financial aid scam artists, with links to mailing lists and discussion groups to help you avoid getting ripped off.

A leisurely visit to Mark's web site should be required reading for anyone looking for college money. Overall grade: A-plus."

A followup article on August 10 updated the URL of the page and added "As I mentioned earlier, this is a great one-stop resource for anyone looking for financial help going to college. If you're looking for money for college, you need to visit this site."

Pittsburgh Tribune-Review (March 24, 1996)

Expert shares financial aid secrets, by Stephen Liss.

"Mark Kantrowitz doesn't charge a nickel for his hobby, despite the fact that his 10 to 40 hours a week of computer tinkering can save an average family thousands of dollars in college tuition costs.

Kantrowitz, 28, of Squirrel Hill is a well known and highly respected financial aid tipster, who spends his time providing practical information to families looking for pecuniary help.

He performs his hobby so well, corporations across the country are banging down his door to sponsor his World Wide Web page. And school administrators ... are begging for the young computer science expert to visit their community and talk with parents.

... The information is placed on Kantrowitz's Web page for anyone to access at no cost. Also included on his computer page are tips for obtaining federal funding and other grants."

Cleveland Plain Dealer (March 18, 1996, Personal Finance, Pade 2D)

Financial Aid Can Be Found on the Web, by Miriam Hill.

"One of the best sources on financial aid is probably sitting in your kid's bedroom.

... You need a modem to get onto the Web, but once you do, you will find more information than you will ever need.

It's even easy to find, thanks to Mark Kantrowitz, a graduate student at Carnegie-Mellon University. He has created a Web page filled with good information as well as links to Web pages offered by universities, the US Department of Education, and others.

To find the page, simply type in the words "Mark Kantrowitz" and "financial aid" on whatever browser you use to navigate the Web.

This will get you to several financial aid sites on the Web. Click on whatever topic pleases you, but be sure to check out "Mark's Picks", Kantrowitz's list of the best financial aid information.

Also take advantage of various calculators he has provided. These let you figure out, for example, how much a school is likely to say your family must contribute to pay for college.

These sites will help you see that you can find a way to pay for college. Kantrowitz himself is a perfect example. He won about $250,000 in various forms of aid to pay for his graduate and undergraduate schooling."

Chicago Tribune (January 4, 1996, Page 3)

Some Really Big Deals on Campus, by Lani Luciano, Money Magazine.

"And don't miss the Financial Aid Information Page."

1995

The Courier Journal (November 11, 1995, Louisville, Kentucky, Page 14S)

Search the Web to Find Financial Aid

"The Internet's World Wide Web can help students and parents search for scholarships and loans.

A good place to start is the Financial Aid Information Page, an online service created by Mark Kantrowitz, author of The Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students. ... His site will point you toward dozens of financial-aid sources, including banks, schools, and private organizations."

The San Francisco Chronicle (October 31, 1995, Page C12)

Can Investors Find Anything Useful and Free on the Net? Here's a guide to some of the free addresses, by Herb Greenberg.

"... Finally, from the personal finance front, if you're looking for information on college financial aid, I highly recommend [address deleted]. It's written by the author of Prentice Hall's Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students. It's not fancy, but it delivers the goods."

Chicago Sun-Times (October 3, 1995, Page 10)

Some Internet Sites, by Elizabeth King.

"Financial Aid FAQ (frequently asked questions) ... Covers advice on saving for college, explanation of various financial aid regulations and policies, and a description of prepaid tuition plans."

The Buffalo News (September 17, 1995, Business, Page 13A)

Sunday File

"Students can find a wealth of tips and advice about obtaining financial aid, as well as listings of available loans, scholarships, and fellowships, on the Internet.

Most of these free on-line financial aid resources have been compiled at a single site on the Internet's World Wide Web.

The test is trying to type in the address: [address deleted] If you can do that, you deserve a scholarship."

The Des Moines Register (September 17, 1995, Job Market, Page 1)

How to find money for college, by Joyce Lain Kennedy, Los Angeles Times Syndicate.

"... FAQ: Financial Aid, Scholarships, and Fellowships [address deleted]. This is an excellent resource for undergraduate and graduate students. It discusses key issues of using fianncial aid consultants and scholarships search services, as well as suggesting the amount of money to save for college."

Chicago Tribune (September 13, 1995, Your Money, Page 3)

Making the grade on college financial aid, by Tedra T. Williams, Knight-Ridder/Tribune.

"... ON-LINE HELP

Students can find a wealth of on-line tips and advice about obtaining financial aid, as well as listings of available loans, scholarships, and fellowships, from the comfort of their desktops.

Most of these free on-line financial aid resources have been compiled at a site on the Internet's World Wide Web at: [address deleted]

The service includes a free scholarship search. Users fill out an on-line form with their ages, ethnic backgrounds, degrees earned, and other information. The program scans its database and spits out a list of possibilities."

The Tampa Tribune (September 12, 1995, Page 7)

Go online for help searching for financial aid, a Knight-Ridder Report.

"The Internet isn't a financial aid panacea - at least, not yet.

But students can find a wealth of on-line tips and advice about obtaining financial aid, as well as listings of available loans, scholarships, and fellowships, from the comfort of their desktops.

Most of these free on-line financial aid resources have been compiled at a site on the Internet's World Wide Web at: [address deleted]

The service includes a free scholarship search - users fill out an on-line form with their ages, ethnic backgrounds, degrees earned and other information. The program scans its database of scholarships - the database included 44 scholarships when I tried it out. Within seconds, the program spits back a list of possible scholarships from the database.

The list also includes a series of advice articles, such as "Avoid Being Taken", which warns readers to beware of scholarship search services, scholarships with application fees, and financial aid consultants. ...

Students who fill out the "Financial Aid Estimation Form" will receive a free, on-screen estimate of their official "expected family contribution" and need. Scholastic aid administrators use these figures to determine which applicants will receive aid.

Users can also look up hundreds of specific aid programs using the online scholarship and fellowship databases."

The Denver Post (September 10, 1995, Page G-05)

College Aid Help

"The Internet now offers students online tips and advice about obtaining financial aid, as well as listings of available loans, scholarships, and fellowships. Most of these free online financial aid resources have been compiled at a site on the Internet's World Wide Web at: [address deleted]"

Los Angeles Times (August 30, 1995, Page D-5)

This Week in Cyberspace, by Adam S. Bauman.

"Need a source for comprehensive college and university financial aid information? This data, along with links to other educational resources on the Net, is at [address deleted]."

 

 
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