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Reviews Published in Magazines

This page contains excerpts from reviews of the Financial Aid Information Page that were published in magazines. This includes reviews from Internet-related magazines that published guides to the best web sites, as well as specific reviews and mentions of the page in major national magazines.

PC Novice Guide to the Web: The 2500 Best Sites (July 1998, page 78)

Where to find scholarships and financial aid

"FinAid®: This free, comprehensive financial aid resource contains everything from a glossary of relevant terms to information about all types of financial aid. Plus, you'll find hyperlinks to other solid financial aid sites on the Web. You can use a calculator to estimate the cost of college, learn about loans and fellowships, or find aid based upon special interests. http://www.finaid.org/"

Yahoo Internet Life (June 1998, page 116)

Personal-Finance Calculators

"Click over to FINAID for the best set of calculators for forecasting everything from how much Junior's tuition might cost to how much college administrators will expect you to pay. And if the combination of your savings, scholarships, and financial aid doesn't cover the tab, site creator Mark Kantrowitz offers a couple of calculators for determining the amount of debt new college grads can reasonably repay and calculators that let you compare the terms of student loans from different banks. www.finaid.org/finaid/calculators/finaid_calc.html"

PC World (May 1998)

Best of the Web: The 1998 Webby Award Winners.

"Money/Business Nominees ... The Financial Aid Information Page, finaid.org"

Catholic Digest (May 1998)

How Can I Get a College Scholarship?

"See also the Web site (http://www.finaid.org/) sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators."

Youthwalk (May 1998)

Scam-Free Way to Search for Financial Aid.

"Getting frustrated in your search for extra funds for college this fall? Then check out the Financial Aid Information Page on the web (www.finaid.com). The page is absolutely FREE and gives you a comprehensive guide to financial aid. It even allows you to search for scholarships and also provides valuable tips on how to avoid scholarship scams."

Business Week (May 4, 1998, page 26J)

Destinations

"WWW.FINAID.ORG The deadline for high school seniors to pick a college is just about here. Now, how to pay the bills? Web resources include the site operated by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, offering what is probably the most comprehensive set of links to useful sites. If you are hoping to get financial aid, including federally subsidized Stafford loans, you should have filled out a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by now. But if you want to get started for next year, the FinAid® page will link you to a site where you can complete the FAFSA online."

Time Digital (April 1998)

Scrolling for Dollars, by Anita Hamilton.

"We pick 10 great Websites that offer expert advice and guidance to help jump-start your finances. ... THE FINANCIAL AID INFORMATION PAGE Yippee! Your daughter just got accepted to the Ivy League school of her dreams. Now for the ahrd part: figuring out how to foot the $120,000-plus bill over the next four years. FinAid®, an independent site written by Mark Kantrowitz, author of the Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students, is the most comprehensive on the Web for finding student loans. Start with the section on frequently asked questions and myths about financial aid and proceed to the handy calculators for a ballpark estimate of how much of a loan you'll need. Next, follow Mark's Picks for links to the best free online scholarship-search services. Don't miss the Scam Alert on dubious loans or Ask the Aid Advisor for answers to specific loan questions. Lastly, pray that your kid doesn't plan on graduate school -- or at least, that her gold-plated degree will land her a job to help pay the next round of tuition."

Redbook (March 1998)

The Right Way to Save for College, by Lynne Cusack.

"Follow this formula from Mark Kantrowitz, founder of the Financial Aid Information Page on the World Wide Web (www.finaid.org)."

Newsweek How to Get Into College (Spring 1998, page 61)

Show Me The Money, by Daniel McGinn.

"You can get guidance from financial-aid consultants or from more than 300 books on the topic (look for brief reviews of them on the Web at www.finaid.org)."

Family Circle/PC World, Computers Made Easy (Spring 1998)

The best of the web

"MONEY. ... Students in search of financial aid can find an intuitive course on loan counseling, tuition, and scholarships at FinAid®: The Financial Aid Information Page (http://www.finaid.org)."

GEICO Direct (Spring 1998)

College Scholarships, by Ingrid M. Rotto.

"Another good site is www.finaid.org."

Home PC (February 1998)

College planning: Do your homework on the Web, by Dean Foust.

"You'll need to find out how much financial aid your child might qualify for. FinAid®: The Financial Aid Information Page (www.finaid.org), a site created by Mark Kantrowitz, author of the Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students, has a free calculator based on the federal government's aid qualification formula. Click on Mark's Calculators, then on Financial Aid Estimation Form. ... One of the best calculators for comparing loans can be found at FinAid®. Click on Mark's Calculators and then on Loan Analyzer. Enter the terms of the loan, and you'll get a single number that creator Mark Kantrowitz immodestly calls the "K-Factor". The lower the K-Factor, the better the loan. While you're at FinAid®, you might want to use two more of Mark's calculators: One tells you how much debt you can carry, based on your income; the other figures the amount of debt a student can reasonably expect to repay based on the typical starting salary for graduates in his or her field."

Online (January-February 1998)

Focus On FinAid® and fastWEB -- Two for the Money!, by Veronica Nance-Mithcell.

"Two excellent sources of information on student financial aid are available free on the World Wide Web. FinAid® (http://www.finaid.org) provides a comprehensive and objective pathway through the maze of financing a college education, giving multiple links to types of aid sources, loans, vendors and services in the financial aid world, discussion lists, and tools for selecting aid and computing the dollars. ... FinAid® is the creation of Mark Kantrowitz, author of The Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students, and is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA). This is an independent collection of fast-changing hotlinks to everything you always wanted to know about government and private student aid and related subjects, including personal finance, admissions testing, college planning, and career resources. In addition to an overview of financial aid, it provides an "Ask the Aid Advisor" service and a "Scam Alert", a useful addition in this hot field. ... The Bottom Line: Although you may want to supplement a search with access to traditional resources, fastWEB provides a good starting point for tracking down student financial aid, and FinAid® will help you interpret the data and be aware of the implications around financial aid commitments. Both services are accessible at no cost and share reciprocating links; FinAid® links to many other excellent financial aid Web sites. Both novice and professional searchers at any postsecondary level are sure to locate current financial aid information related to their interest."

Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine (January 1998, page 96)

College Aid: The Nitty-Gritty Guide, by Kristin Davis.

"You can take some of the mystery out of the process by computing your own EFC. Guidance counselors and financial-aid officers can give you worksheets, or you can use an online calculator, such as the one at http://www.finaid.org/finaid/calculators/.)"

Boston Parent's Paper (January 1998)

Finding Hidden Monies for College

"There are two Web sites -- www.collegeboard.org and www.finaid.org -- with worksheets that will help you determine your EFC. ... Financial Aid Information Page, www.finaid.org. This site offers a range of tips from scam alerts to scholarship searches."

Baltimore's Child (January 1998)

Going Back to College Can Be Affordable, by Danielle Sweeney.

"Resources on the Web: http://www.finaid.org Loads of links to all types of financial aid sites."

Family Money (Better Homes and Gardens) (Winter 1997/98, page 102)

Family Money Magazine's favorite Web addresses

"Personal Finance. National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators: www.finaid.com. When you start looking for college tuition cash, here's a starting point."

Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine (December 1997, page 50)

The mother lode for scholars

"You'll find links to all four search services at www.finaid.org, the best all-around Web site for college students and parents in search of financial aid."

Business Week (November 10, 1997, page 154)

The ABCs of Financial Aid, by Jim Ellis.

"Q: Where do I find more information on scholarships and aid?

A: Go Web, young man. Your first stop should be the excellent Financial Aid Information Page site (www.finaid.org) sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators."

Bottom Line Personal (November 1, 1997)

Financial Aid Information on the Internet.

"The web site of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, http://www.finaid.org, offers links to the financial aid offices at many institutions and other sources."

PC Novice Computing for Parents (Volume 3, Issue 10, 1997)

Top 10 Scholarship Web Sites, by Shannon Heffelfinger.

"The Financial Aid Information Page. Access to more than 40 free scholarship searches and information pertaining to loans, scams, government aid, and college planning makes the Financial Aid Information Page the most complete and thorough scholarship page on the Web. The pool of databases, which you can open by left-clicking the Scholarship/Fellowship option in the Sources of Aid menu, is highlighted by links to FastWEB, ExPAN, SRN, and CollegeNet MACH25. Also available to you under Sources of Aid are grants, contests, prepaid tuition plans, tuition payment plans, and study abroad programs. If you just can't find what you're looking for after scanning 40 databases, the special interest section lists 13 groups of specific scholarships with categories including Sports, International, Veteran/Military Aid, and Disabled. Another location to check out is Mark's Calculators. Make sure to view this portion of the page with your parents. The calculators are easy to use and include a cost and savings projector while helping you determine annual yield and compound interest. Additionally, life insurance, financial aid estimation, and loan advisor calculators are also available. You shouldn't leave this page without viewing the items in the Assistance menu. The Scam Alert warns students about possible fraud, the Common Myths may help reassure parents who are reluctant to apply for financial aid, and the Free Documents contain interesting articles and advice about federal and state aid and ways to save money."

Time Out New York (October 9, 1997)

When reality bites, there's always graduate school, by David Ball.

"As you get further into the application process, you'll need to start thinking about how to pay for school. FinAid® (www.finaid.org) has a good collection of links, lenders and lending codes, books, tapes, software, and online financial aid calculators."

Playboy Magazine (October 1997)

For Collegians Only

"Finaid (www.finaid.com), College Board Online (www.collegeboard.org), and Fastweb (www.fastweb.com): Cash-poor collegians can use these sites to track down loans and scholarship money."

New Physician (October 1997)

Financial Medical Education, by Christine Wiebe.

"Perhaps the most comprehensive service available, at no cost, is a World Wide Web search. One of the best sites is "The Financial Aid Information Page" at http://www.finaid.org. The site is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, and it provides dozens of links to relevant sites."

Central Florida Family (October 1997)

www.financialhelp.please

"Following are a sampling of financial websites that may aid in planning the family's financial future: www.finaid.org This website is of great use to families seeking financial aid to finance higher education. Convenient access to information about available scholarships, grants and loans for private high schools, colleges, and graduate schools."

Campus Life (October 1997, page 110)

Surf Your Way to Campus, by Tim Ostermiller.

"The Internet and World Wide Web are loaded with information about picking the right school, finding out what each college offers, getting scholarships, receiving financial aid, and even applying online! We surfed the Web for some of the most helpful college-info sites: FinAid® http://www.finaid.org Unless you've recently inherited a ton of money, you're probably going to need some cash to afford school. This site is the No. 1 source for financial aid info. It's all here: scholarship databases that take your survey answers and hook you up with potential cash; loan payment schedules to print out so you don't miss payments; sources of aid, including grants and special contests; and forecasting calculators to determine what you'll need and when you'll need it."

Technology & Learning (October 1997)

The Online Connection: Electronic Trails to College, by Odvard Egil Dyrli.

"Seeking Financial Aid. ... FinAid® (www.finaid.org) - a comprehensive and independent guide to student financial aid sources and services."

Web-Guide Magazine (September/October 1997, pages 43-44)

Using Web Resources to Select and Prepare for College, by Art Mandel.

"http://www.finaid.org/ This site provides by far the best and most comprehensive information about financial aid found anywhere on the Internet. This site is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, an organization of all the financial administrators in the country. A nice feature of this site is the links to other programs mentioned earlier in this article. ... This home page has an impressive list of 80 links, everything from navigation directions to admission testing, colleges for students with disabilities, private high schools, and medical, law, and business graduate school information. The financial aid estimator is the most comprehensive but also the most cumbersome to manage. ..."

Advocate (September 16, 1997)

Cash for college, by Eric Haeberli.

"If you've got money to spare and don't want to give it to an alma mater you perceive as homophobic, you can always set up your own scholarship and help needy lesbian, gay, and bisexual students. Financial Aid for Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Students is a subsection of FinAid® Page Inc. The Web site's publisher, Mark Kantrowitz, a straight man, says he added the section with help from several lesbian, gay, and bisexual financial-aid administrators because he received a lot of requests for it. "Aggregate usage statistics for that section of the page support that decision," he says. "For example, about the same number of visitors look at the lesbian, gay, and bisexual section as look at the sports section." http://www.finaid.org/finaid/focus/lgb.html"

Money Magazine (September 1, 1997)

Cutting Costs

"The Financial Aid Information Page (http://www.finaid.org) provides links to more than 1,000 sites posting scholarship information."

Attache (September 1997)

Tuition.com

"How do you pay for your kid's college? Before doing the campus visits, tour them virtually through these websites recommended by Ken Hartman in his book, Internet Guide for College-Bound Students, published by the College Board. ... FINANCIAL AID: www.finaid.org"

Newsweek (August 11, 1997)

Seeing the Sites: A few choice Web screens will broaden your view -- and fatten your portfolio, by Ellyn E. Spragins.

"Locating money for college: The Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students costs $29.95 at Barnes & Noble. But Mark Kantrowitz, one of its authors, reveals almost everything about scaring up scholarships, grants and loans for private high schools, colleges and graduate schools at FinAid® (www.finaid.org). A key service: a calculator to help you figure your "expected family contribution", vital for aid applications. Consultants charge $150 to $250 for such estimates and advice. You can also find dollars-and-cents answers on an array of other issues, including how much debt you can afford, which loan deal is better, and the minimum value for your house, used by many private colleges to weigh your family's need. In addition to puncturing financial-aid myths, FinAid® customizes its advice for special groups, such as older, foreign, and disabled students. But the site's not just for do-it-yourselfers. You'll find links to other sources of aid information as well as to consultants and commercial search services."

Library Journal (August 1, 1997, pages 29-30)

WebWatch, by Eileen Flick.

"Why use the web, rather than the still very useful and plentiful scholarship books found in most libraries? Two words: convenience and currency. While it may be necessary to search several books to track down all possible resources, a gateway site like FinAid® can quickly pull together a wide range of possibilities. ... So consider books in tandem with the web.

WEB OF THE MONTH: FINAID http://www.finaid.org/ .. FinAid® is a huge, comprehensive site that provides free access to a wide variety of financial aid resources. it was created in 1994 by Mark Kantrowitz, a research scientist at Justsystem Pittsburgh Research Center, and is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. FinAid®'s design is simple and straightforward, with a directory somewhat similar to that of Yahoo -- and yes, it includes advertising. Among the several categories, Sources of Aid is particularly useful. ... The site's section on educational loans links to online counseling, details on the various lending institutions, and a tool that allows students to track down a lender's code to complete Stafford and PLUS loan applications. An online calculator will estimate total college costs, based on current annual costs plus the number of years until enrollment. Other calculators can help develop a savings plan, useful for both parents and collegebound students. Under the category of Assistance, an interesting link is called "Scam Alert" and offers tips on how to identify a scam (beware official-sounding names and fees), and what to do if you think you have encountered one. ... The site also offers a good annotated bibliography of books on scholarships. Pros/Cons: With its simple directory tree structure, this comprehensive site is easy to navigate. Bottom Line: FinAid® is the single best starting point for the range of free information on financial aid. "

Time The Best College for You (Spring 1997, page 74)

Financial Aid on the Internet

"Another great site is the Financial Aid Information Page at www.finaid.com. One of the great features of this page is its many calculators that can help you calculate almost every figure related to paying for college, from estimating the cost of college in 2002 to figuring out how much a $1,200 college fund will be worth in 15 years. Another great calculator can estimate your EFC using either the federal or a generic methodology. The numbers you'll arrive at won't be your exact EFC, but they will give you an idea of how much you can expect to pay and how much you will need to receive from a college."

Business Leader (April 1997, page 22)

Help! My kid's going to college!, by Don Anderson.

Business Leader recommended the FinAid® Page as one of four web sites to visit for additional information.

Leadership Journal (April-June 1997, page 89)

Digging Out and Saving Up, by Ginger E. McFarland.

"Get a scholarship. An estimated $1.25 billion in scholarships are awarded each year. You can research them through the FinAid® Website (www.finaid.org), which offers links to 42 scholarship databases."

Yahoo Internet Life (April 1997, page 93)

In Finding Financial Aid for College, Yahoo Internet Life named the FinAid® Page the best site for information about student financial aid, giving it a four-star rating, writing: "Make FINAID your first stop. This site -- created by Mark Kantrowitz, graduate student and author of the Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students -- offers some of the best "how to" guidance on securing financial aid. Kantrowitz provides "how not to" advice as well -- including a Scam Alert guide to spotting dubious scholarships and aid consultants. You will also find links galore to scholarship databases and student lenders, and calculators that let you do everything from comparing loan terms to figuring out how much it will cost to send a kid to college in 25 years. (Answer: about $475,000 for a private college. Yow!) www.finaid.org ****"

The Web Magazine (February/March 1997, page 71)

In Dollars for Scholars, Eric Tyson wrote: "... Fortunately, the Internet has become a great source of information: If you know where to look online, you'll find plenty of objective and insightful advice concerning college financial aid. Your first stop should be The Financial Aid Information Page (FinAid®), a detailed map to the best financial aid resources on the Internet. This Web site is maintained by Mark Kantrowitz, author of the Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students, and is sponsored by the nonprofit National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA). FinAid® provides information on and links to free scholarship search databases, financial aid calculators, periodicals of interest, scholarship scams and how to avoid them, a directory of the home pages of university financial aid offices, government loan programs, and more."

Family Circle Magazine (February 1, 1997)

Scholarships: Fast money or fraud?

"Here are some legitimate sources for information on financial aid: The National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators has set up a Web site that outlines the entire financial aid process for students and parents (www.finaid.org)."

Money Magazine (January 1997, page 128)

In Stop throwing away $5,000 a year, Gary Belsky wrote: "Find out about great scholarship deals on the Internet through the FinAid® Website (www.finaid.org), which offers links to 42 scholarship databases."

Family PC (January 1997, page 38)

In Clue In to College, College CD-ROMs and Web Sites Offer Information and Insight, Robin Raskin wrote: "If you're looking for grants, tuition payment plans, or anything else related to financial aid, check out FinAid®, from the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators."

Teen Times (November 1996 - January 1997, page 10)

The Great Scholarship Safari.

"There's also lots of scholarship info on the World Wide Web. ... If you have access, you might want to visit -- http://www.finaid.org, the financial aid information page, sponsored by the National Association of Financial Aid Administrators; includes a link to FastWEB, a free scholarship identification search."

Web Now (Winter 1997, page 27)

Web Now was formerly known as I-Way. This magazine is published six times a year and regularly issues lists of the top 500 web sites, listing 17 sites in each of 30 categories. The FinAid® Page has been listed in two previous issues of I-Way magazine. The FinAid® Page is ranked 7th in the Consumer category of this issue of Web Now, with an overall score of 289 out of a maximum 300, with scores of 100 for content, 93 for design, and 96 for experience. Web Now wrote, in their review of the FinAid® Page: "A superb collection of information on scholarships, grants, fellowships, contests, tuition-payment plans, exchange programs, private loans, scam alerts, and more. Don't leave for college without it!"

The only other financial aid site to make the cut was the US Department of Education's Student Guide, which ranked 13th.

HomePC Magazine, 500 Best Web Sites (December 1996)

HomePC Magazine announced on January 2, 1997, that it has chosen the FinAid® Page as one of the top 500 on the Web in their first Best Web Sites survey. The FinAid® Page was one of 300 web sites featured in the December 1996 issue of HomePC Magazine. In their review of the FinAid® Page they wrote: "Use the on-line calculators to estimate the amount of aid for which you might qualify, then jump to sites with information on scholarships and fellowships."

Worth (December 1996, page 132)

In Get College Credit: Apply for scholarship money through the Internet, Ellen DePasquale wrote: "Are you looking at a college-tuition bill that causes you to consider taking a second mortgage? Before you head to the bank, take a seat at your computer; the Internet could be your safety net. Countless Web sites offer information on financial aid from a wealth of resources. You can find government assistance, information on individual schools, scholarship-search firms, and searchable online databases.

Perhaps the most comprehensive site is FinAid®, the Financial Aid Information Page (http://www.finaid.com), which is sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. FinAid® offers numerous links for every financial-aid category listed above and is well organized and easy to navigate."

SmartMoney (December 1996, page 123)

"For more specific loan information, check out the Web site run by financial-aid expert Mark Kantrowitz (www.finaid.org). You can also find scholarship information on this site."

Business Week (November 11, 1996)

In Surf the Web for College Dollars, Jim Ellis wrote: "Start Web surfing at the excellent Financial Aid Information Page. This comprehensive site is a well-organized trove of information for both students and the parents who bankroll them. Especially useful is its rich collection of financial calculators, including programs to help estimate the amount parents are expected to pay for college under federal guidelines, various calculations on investments you may want to tap, and even projections on the cost of tuition at your kid's dream school four - or maybe five or six - years from now. Simply plug in your financial data, and the figures pop up on your screen. Keep a pencil or printer nearby, however, since you can't save personal information on the pages. ... Great source of general information, plus an especially rich variety of online calculators."

Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine (October 1996, page 74)

www.$$$.com, by Elizabeth Razzi and Ronaleen R. Roha.

"Search long enough and you can find financial Web sites that will knock your socks off. We did the searching for you. ... College Planning. FinAid®, The Financial Aid Information Page (www.finaid.org). A powerhouse site for seekers of money for college: Estimate how much aid you'll qualify for with an online form, connect with college financial aid offices, link to hundreds of sites - including a database of more than 180,000 scholarships and lists of student aid lenders."

The Web Magazine (October/November 1996, page 83)
The Financial Aid Information Page was one of 500 web sites reviewed in the premier issue of The Web Magazine. The review states "Mark Kantrowitz, author of the The Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students, has put together an awesome collection of links on the general subject of financial aid. You'll find everything: financial aid calculators, lists of grants, some excellent FAQs. If you want dough for a diploma, start here."

SmartMoney (September 1996)

Hard Lessons: Putting scholarship services to the test, by David Mederrick.

"... Kantrowitz's site is a good place to go with questions about a particular service or for general information on common scholarship scams. ..."

US News & World Report (September 23, 1996, pages 88-89)

The scholarship scam game, by Mary Lord. Also appears in the 1997 Edition of US News & World Report's America's Best Colleges, pages 112-113.

"... Tens of thousands of financially frantic families fall prey to spurious scholarship offers each year, according to Mark Kantrowitz, an authority on scholarships whose highly regarded Financial Aid Information Page on the World Wide Web (http://www.finaid.org/) boasts an extensive scam alert."

Time Magazine The Best College For You (Fall 1996, page 64)
The Financial Aid Information Page was mentioned in a sidebar entitled Financial Aid on the Internet that appears in the 1997 Edition of Time Magazine's The Best College For You. The review wrote: "There are a lot of great resources on the Internet for information on financial aid. The government's site provides tons of advice on applying for every kind of federal aid, including work-study programs and military scholarships. Another great site is the Financial Aid Information Page. One of the great features of this page is its many calculators that can help you calculate almost every figure that has to do with paying for college, from estimating the cost of college in 2002 to figuring out how much a $1,200 dollar college fund will be worth in fifteen years. Also provided is a calculator to estimate your EFC using either the federal methodology or a generic methodology. The numbers you'll arrive at won't be exactly the same as your actual EFC, but they will give you a great idea of how much you can expect to pay and how much you will need to receive from a college."

Newsweek How to Get Into College (Fall 1996, page 39)
The Financial Aid Information Page was listed in the Finding a School in Cyberspace/General Financial Aid Information section of the 1997 Edition of Newsweek's How to Get Into College. The review wrote "FinAid® (The Financial Aid Information Page): Sponsored by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, this page provides links to hundreds of sources of information about student financial aid, including FastWeb, a searchable database of more than 180,000 private-sector scholarships, fellowships, grants and loans. http://www.finaid.org/"

Money Magazine (September 1996, page 133)

How You Can Win the Crowded Race for Scholarships, by Gary Belsky.

"Also have your child search the Internet for scholarships, using a computer at home or at school. For instance, the FinAid® Website (http://www.finaid.org/) can link you to 42 scholarship databases like FastWEB. It enables users to search for scholarships that match their individual qualifications and interests, such as hobbies, geographical region and family background."

Yahoo! Internet Life (May/June 1996 issue, page 88)

The May/June 1996 issue of Yahoo! Internet Life reviewed student financial aid web sites that "offer practical information that applies to most schools". Only two sites were identified as being "The Best" and were named as four star sites: The Financial Aid Information Page and the U.S. Department of Education's Student Guide.

"The Financial Aid Information Page is an all-encompassing storehouse created by Mark Kantrowitz, author of The Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students and graduate student at Carnegie Mellon University. Perhaps one of the most useful features here is Scam Alert, a consumer guide to how the scholarship finding process is supposed to work that also includes contact information (links where available) to groups such as the National Fraud Information Center, where you can report dubious for-fee scholarship services. The multitude of handy tools and lists includes a FAQ; important phone numbers; financial aid terms; and links to universities' financial aid offices, mailing lists, and newsgroups. In other words, if you're looking for information you couldn't find at the Dept. of Education site, it's bound to be here."

"Mark's Financial Aid Calculators, also developed by Mark Kantrowitz, are programs that let you crunch numbers (if not hopes) by showing you how much the little tyke's Harvard education will cost you in the year 2010, adjusted for inflation, of course. Other calculators here let you project costs and needed savings as well as compare loan payments and terms."

I-way (Spring 1996 issue; available on newsstands February 26, 1996)

The I-way 500 ranked sites in 20 categories, scoring them based on seven specific criteria, and selecting the 25 best sites in each category. The Financial Aid Information Page was a winner in two categories, placing sixth in the Consumer/Personal Resources category and thirteenth in the Finance category. The only other financial aid site to win in any category was the US Department of Education's Student Guide, which placed 25th in the Finance category. The Financial Aid Information Page is also the only site to win in two different categories.

Consumer/Personal Resources. Page 27. The Financial Aid Information Page received a total score of 435/460 points (100/100 Serves Intended Purpose, 98/100 Depth of Content, 75/75 Navigation, 75/75 Accuracy, 50/50 Accessibility, 37/50 Design/Style, and 0/10 Performance), placing sixth overall. Their review says "Scholarships, fellowships, grants, loans, and tuition payment plans are just the beginning at the Financial Aid Information page. Here you can calculate the amount your family will probably need to contribute, read up on financial aid scams, and look into studying abroad. This well connected site is maintained by the author of the Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students, however the advice is useful to all.

Finance. Page 44. The Financial Aid Information Page received a total score of 365/460 points (90/100 Serves Intended Purpose, 85/100 Depth of Content, 60/75 Navigation, 75/75 Accuracy, 45/50 Accessibility, 10/50 Design/Style, and 0/10 Performance), placing thirteenth overall. Their review says "The Financial Aid Information page is an amazing resource for students and their parents seeking financial aid. Maintained by Mark Kantrowitz, the author of the Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students, this site is complete and concise."

I-way (Fall 1996 issue; available on newsstands August 26, 1996)

The I-way 500 ranked sites in 20 categories, scoring them based on seven specific criteria, and selecting the 25 best sites in each category. The Financial Aid Information Page was a winner in the Consumer/Personal Resources category of the Fall 1996 I-way 500 listing, placing 15th with 428 points out of a maximum 460 (100/100 Serves Intended Purpose, 100/100 Depth of Content, 75/75 Navigation, 75/75 Accuracy, 50/50 Accessibility, 25/50 Design/Style, and 0/10 Performance). Their review says "Heading for college or sending an offspring? Use the financial-aid calculator to estimate the damage, then get the bottom line on scholarships, fellowships, grants, tuition payment plans, exchange programs, lenders, guarantors, assistance scams, and much more."

PC Magazine (February 6, 1996 issue)

The Financial Aid Information Page was named one of the Top 100 Web Sites by PC Magazine in the February 6, 1996 issue. Their review says "When ... you can't dig the tuition out of your porcelain piggy bank, the Financial Aid Information home page may be your savior. Mark Kantrowitz's collection of books, phone numbers, Usenet newsgroups, services, bibliographies, and mailing lists gives you a roadmap to all the latest grants, loans, scholarships and fellowships. It also offers FastWeb -- a searchable database of even more financial aid information -- and a plug for Kantrowitz's magnum opus, The Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students."

Money Magazine (October 1995 issue, pages 130-137)

Use Your Computer to Locate Financial Aid for College, by Derek Gordon.

"And don't miss the Financial Aid Information Page recently created by Mark Kantrowitz, a graduate student at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh and co-author of the Prentice Hall Guide to Scholarships and Fellowships for Math and Science Students ($19.95). His site provides an excellent general introduction to the aid chase plus a number of electronic extras, like a computerized worksheet that shows how much schools will expect your family to contribute to the yearly tab for tuition, room, board and fees."

Computer Life (August 17, 1995)

In Untangling Financial Aid on the Web, Marlene Goldman writes that "the prospect of fumbling through stacks of oversized financial aid directories is so daunting for some parents and students that they miss out on their share of the more than $35 billion available each year in the United States for college funding. The Internet's World Wide Web, however, can be a fruitful alternative to the local library. Try using some of the following sites to spearhead your search for the money that might be waiting for you." The first site she recommends is the Financial Aid Information Page:

"The Internet's Financial Aid Information Page is a guide to the most up-to-date financial aid information on the Web. It directs you to financial-aid book publishers, gives telephone numbers for questions about federal student aid, and provides information from university financial aid offices. It also points you to vast databases of scholarships, student loans, grants, and fellowships."

NetGuide Magazine (August 1995 issue, pages 76-78, 86-88)

The August 1995 issue of NetGuide Magazine reviewed the Financial Aid Information Page and the Financial Aid FAQ posting as part of a review of online financial aid information for their College Roundup issue (Net Worth: Electric School Aid, by Joanne Charles). This issue of NetGuide Magazine is especially helpful for its review of the financial aid offerings of America Online, Compuserve, and Prodigy.

page 77: "The Financial Aid Information Page ... is probably the best of what the Web offers, with its links to in-depth and helpful information. The Glossary of Financial Aid Terms is a must-read."

page 87-88: "If you've got Internet access, you should be able to get to this FAQ, by hook, by crook or anonymous FTP. And if you can get it, you should - assuming that finding a terrific information resource on college and graduate school financial aid appears on your list of life goals. The FAQ ... provides tips on everything from using financial aid consultants and scholarship search services (don't) to saving for your child's college education (do - about $400, beginning at birth and once monthly thereafter). The FAQ also points the way to offline resources on both general and more specific topics, such as foundation grants and financing graduate school."

Internet World (April 1995 issue, v6n4, pages 110-111)

Have I Got a Deal for You, by Linda J. Engelman.

"School Daze ... Use your Web browser and head immediately to the online financial aid information page. This site is exceptional, offering information on scholarships, fellowships, and grants plus links to lots of other monetary sources.

For example, there are links that take you to various university financial aid offices and to free documents that can be downloaded and printed to a PostScript printer. You'll find specific information on educational funding for women, minorities, and graduate students.

There is one annoyance about this site - its URL address is so long you just might want to forget about college altogether by the time you get to the information. However, if you can get past that little hurdle, you'll find it to be a very worthwhile stop along your Net journey."

Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine (October 1994 issue, page 34)

"One of the best finds there for students and their parents is the Financial Aid Information Page, a repository for university listings of scholarships, fellowships, and grants for undergraduate and graduate students."

 

 
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